GeorgeJ

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15 years, 297 days

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These are replies submitted by GeorgeJ

I have not been able to find a way to make MAPLE estimate compile time. If there is a way I would appreciate you showing me how to do it. The following info is based upon very rough stopwatch estimating. On my computer the following code compiles in about one second in MAPLE 11 and takes almost 6 seconds in MAPLE 10. View 2292_CodeTest.mw on MapleNet or Download 2292_CodeTest.mw
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Thank you for your reply. I have found the MathML Web page and am studying it. At this point I am still puzzled by how MAPLE implements with MathML. I found the definition of the MathML command ‘mover’ but am still perplexed by the MAPLE syntax s:=`#mover(mi(theta),mo(“^”))`. Am I to understand that if you enclose something in left single quotes, and if the charcacter immedeatly after the first left single quote is #, then the remaining characters are interpreted as a MathML call ? Is that documented somewhere? Also, the MathML web site gives the following syntax example: {mrow} {mover accent="true"} {mi} x {/mi} {mo} ^ {/mo} {/mover} {mtext} versus {/mtext} {mover accent="false"} {mi} x {/mi} {mo} ^ {/mo} {/mover} {/mrow} (Actually, I replaced the standard brackets w curly brackets because stuff in standard brackets doesn’t seem to show up in these posts). The statement {mover accent="true"} is an important part of the syntax for determining how high the raised element is. How would you implement something like that in MAPLE. I tried s:=`#mover(mi(theta),mo("^"),accent=true)` And it doesn’t seem to make any difference.
Thank you for your reply. I have found the MathML Web page and am studying it. At this point I am still puzzled by how MAPLE implements with MathML. I found the definition of the MathML command ‘mover’ but am still perplexed by the MAPLE syntax s:=`#mover(mi(theta),mo(“^”))`. Am I to understand that if you enclose something in left single quotes, and if the charcacter immedeatly after the first left single quote is #, then the remaining characters are interpreted as a MathML call ? Is that documented somewhere? Also, the MathML web site gives the following syntax example: {mrow} {mover accent="true"} {mi} x {/mi} {mo} ^ {/mo} {/mover} {mtext} versus {/mtext} {mover accent="false"} {mi} x {/mi} {mo} ^ {/mo} {/mover} {/mrow} (Actually, I replaced the standard brackets w curly brackets because stuff in standard brackets doesn’t seem to show up in these posts). The statement {mover accent="true"} is an important part of the syntax for determining how high the raised element is. How would you implement something like that in MAPLE. I tried s:=`#mover(mi(theta),mo("^"),accent=true)` And it doesn’t seem to make any difference.
But J, my point is not that the explaination for copy in the help file is inadequate, but rather that I didn't know the command existed and so would have never thought to type ?copy. I realize one might argue that I should have figured out the possibility that such a command exists.
But J, my point is not that the explaination for copy in the help file is inadequate, but rather that I didn't know the command existed and so would have never thought to type ?copy. I realize one might argue that I should have figured out the possibility that such a command exists.
Alex, I would give the following advice to new users of MAPLE. Keep 2 files open, one in doc mode and the other in worksheet mode. Do the "heavy lifting" in worksheet mode, then when you have everything working the way it is supposed to, you can paste into document mode for better looking output. If you want to make changes, go back to worksheet mode. Needless to say, I haven’t always followed this advice. BTW, I find that sometimes I have to compose a post in WORD and copy it to the text box in MAPLEPRIMES because my browser doesn't show all the text box. I wonder if this is a problem peculiar to my system or if others are having this problem. I have enclosed a JPEG file to illustrate the situation. It appears that I haven't been able to include in my post a link to the uploaded file. I guess this is because it is JPEG. Anyway, the file is uploaded, and the name is Problem w MAPLEPRIMES.jpg
Alex, I would give the following advice to new users of MAPLE. Keep 2 files open, one in doc mode and the other in worksheet mode. Do the "heavy lifting" in worksheet mode, then when you have everything working the way it is supposed to, you can paste into document mode for better looking output. If you want to make changes, go back to worksheet mode. Needless to say, I haven’t always followed this advice. BTW, I find that sometimes I have to compose a post in WORD and copy it to the text box in MAPLEPRIMES because my browser doesn't show all the text box. I wonder if this is a problem peculiar to my system or if others are having this problem. I have enclosed a JPEG file to illustrate the situation. It appears that I haven't been able to include in my post a link to the uploaded file. I guess this is because it is JPEG. Anyway, the file is uploaded, and the name is Problem w MAPLEPRIMES.jpg
I'm working on a worksheet to teach MAPLE by showing how to use it to derive the quadratic equation by completing the square. I'm at this point x+(1/2)*B = (1/2)*sqrt(B^2-4*C) (9) In this case the next command is (9)-(1/2)*B But what if I had this { x+(1/2)*B = (1/2)*sqrt(B^2-4*C), x+(1/2)*B = - (1/2)*sqrt(B^2-4*C)} (9) What simple command could I give to get this { x = -(1/2)*B +(1/2)*sqrt(B^2-4*C), x = -(1/2)*B - (1/2)*sqrt(B^2-4*C)} Is there some simple way to do this without using map ?
I understood the construction a1, b1 := op(map(x->f(f), [a0, b0])) but I didn't know you could obtain the same with a1, b1 := map(x->f(f), [a0, b0])[] It is a fair statement that in cases like this 'expr []' is the equivalent of 'op(expr)' ?
Jacques, the construction you showed me, namely a,b = (f1,f2) (arg) as a compact way of writing a,b = f1(arg),f2(arg) has got me to wondering ... is there any way of getting a,b = LongfFunctionName(arg1), LongFunctionName(arg2) without having to write 'LongfFunctionName' twice? Clearly a,b = LongFunctionName(arg1,arg2) wouldn't work, because MAPLE would think you were trying to feed 2 args to LongFunctionName -regards
Jacques, There is alot in your post that is very helpful. Let me quickly respond to one of the things you brought up. I was unaware of the construction (num,den) = (numer,denom) (exper1) Actually this works too num,den = (numer,denom) (exper1) I can see what's happening here. This is equivalent to num, den = numer(expr1), denom(exper1) But in the former case you only had to write (exper1) one time. This certainly saves time (which is an extremely important goal) but I am mulling over in my mind whether or not it would be a good idea to present this sophisticated construction to someone just starting out in MAPLE. Do you know where I might find this syntax explained either in the printed documentation or the help file? In any event, thank you for bring to my attention a useful feature of MAPLE of which I was unaware.
I am very far from being an expert on Laplace transforms, but when I took the Laplace transform of the result you got when you took the inverse transform of X, I got back an expression which was mathematically the same as X, although it looked different and I had to play around with it a bit. I would suggest you try this. Maybe the answer MAPLE gave is correct.
Thank you Joe. Your solution is obviously way preferable to mine. I wonder if I might trouble you for an explanation. I halfway understand the statement frontend(LinearAlgebra:-Eigenvectors, [A(p)], [{Matrix},{}]); I looked up frontend, of which I was unaware until your post. What I can't figure out is 1) why is the second argument, A(p), enclosed in square brackets? 2) what is the function of the third argument, [{Matrix},{}] ? I've not seen a construction like that before, and I'm at a total loss to figure how it parses. I can't figure out why the square brackets, why is meant by {Matrix} and what is meant by {}. Other than that I understand it perfectly :). regards
Thank you Joe. Your solution is obviously way preferable to mine. I wonder if I might trouble you for an explanation. I halfway understand the statement frontend(LinearAlgebra:-Eigenvectors, [A(p)], [{Matrix},{}]); I looked up frontend, of which I was unaware until your post. What I can't figure out is 1) why is the second argument, A(p), enclosed in square brackets? 2) what is the function of the third argument, [{Matrix},{}] ? I've not seen a construction like that before, and I'm at a total loss to figure how it parses. I can't figure out why the square brackets, why is meant by {Matrix} and what is meant by {}. Other than that I understand it perfectly :). regards
Thanks for pointing that out to me. I just made the change you suggested. Now when I type x' := 4 I get the error message "unable to match delimiters". It works when I type `x'` := 4 but if I want my input to use primes and to look more like traditional math notation is there any way I could avoid having to input using the ` symbol?
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