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Controlled platform with 6 degrees of freedom. It has three rotary-inclined racks of variable length:

and an example of movement parallel to the base:

Perhaps the Stewart platform may not reproduce such trajectories, but that is not the point. There is a way to select a design for those specific functions that our platform will perform. That is, first we consider the required trajectories of the platform movement, and only then we select a driving device that can reproduce them. For example, we can fix the extreme positions of the actuators during the movement of the platform and compare them with the capabilities of existing designs, or simulate your own devices.
In this case, the program consists of three parts. (The text of the program directly for the first figure : PLATFORM_6.mw) In the first part, we select the starting point for the movement of a rigid body with six degrees of freedom. Here three equations f6, f7, f8 are responsible for the six degrees of freedom. The equations f1, f2, f3, f4, f5 define a trajectory of motion of a rigid body. The coordinates of the starting point are transmitted via disk E for the second part of the program. In the second part of the program, the trajectory of a rigid body is calculated using the Draghilev method. Then the trajectory data is transferred via the disk E for the third part of the program.
In the third part of the program, the visualization is executed and the platform motion drive device is modeled.
It is like a sketch of a possible way to create controlled platforms with six degrees of freedom. Any device that can provide the desired trajectory can be inserted into the third part. At the same time, it is obvious that the geometric parameters of the movement of this device with the control of possible emergency positions and the solution of the inverse kinematics problem can be obtained automatically if we add the appropriate code to the program text.
Equations can be of any kind and can be combined with each other, and they must be continuously differentiable. But first, the equations must be reduced to uniform variables in order to apply the Draghilev method.
(These examples use implicit equations for the coordinates of the vertices of the triangle.)

In the study of the Gödel spacetime model, a tetrad was suggested in the literature [1]. Alas, upon entering the tetrad in question, Maple's Tetrad's package complained that that matrix was not a tetrad! What went wrong? After an exchange with Edgardo S. Cheb-Terrab, Edgardo provided us with awfully useful comments regarding the use of the package and suggested that the problem together with its solution be presented in a post, as others may find it of some use for their work as well.

 

The Gödel spacetime solution to Einsten's equations is as follows.

 

Physics:-Version()

`The "Physics Updates" version in the MapleCloud is 858 and is the same as the version installed in this computer, created 2020, October 27, 10:19 hours Pacific Time.`

(1)

with(Physics); with(Tetrads)

_______________________________________________________

 

`Setting `*lowercaselatin_ah*` letters to represent `*tetrad*` indices`

 

((`Defined as tetrad tensors `*`see <a href='http://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/search.aspx?term=Physics,tetrads`*`,' target='_new'>?Physics,tetrads`*`,</a> `*`&efr;`[a, mu]*`, `)*eta[a, b]*`, `*gamma[a, b, c]*`, `)*lambda[a, b, c]

 

((`Defined as spacetime tensors representing the NP null vectors of the tetrad formalism `*`see <a href='http://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/search.aspx?term=Physics,tetrads`*`,' target='_new'>?Physics,tetrads`*`,</a> `*l[mu]*`, `)*n[mu]*`, `*m[mu]*`, `)*conjugate(m[mu])

 

_______________________________________________________

(2)

Working with Cartesian coordinates,

Coordinates(cartesian)

`Systems of spacetime coordinates are:`*{X = (x, y, z, t)}

 

{X}

(3)

the Gödel line element is

 

ds^2 = d_(t)^2-d_(x)^2-d_(y)^2+(1/2)*exp(2*q*y)*d_(z)^2+2*exp(q*y)*d_(z)*d_(t)

ds^2 = Physics:-d_(t)^2-Physics:-d_(x)^2-Physics:-d_(y)^2+(1/2)*exp(2*q*y)*Physics:-d_(z)^2+2*exp(q*y)*Physics:-d_(z)*Physics:-d_(t)

(4)

Setting the metric

Setup(metric = rhs(ds^2 = Physics[d_](t)^2-Physics[d_](x)^2-Physics[d_](y)^2+(1/2)*exp(2*q*y)*Physics[d_](z)^2+2*exp(q*y)*Physics[d_](z)*Physics[d_](t)))

_______________________________________________________

 

`Coordinates: `*[x, y, z, t]*`. Signature: `*`- - - +`

 

_______________________________________________________

 

Physics:-g_[mu, nu] = Matrix(%id = 18446744078354506566)

 

_______________________________________________________

 

`Setting `*lowercaselatin_is*` letters to represent `*space*` indices`

 

[metric = {(1, 1) = -1, (2, 2) = -1, (3, 3) = (1/2)*exp(2*q*y), (3, 4) = exp(q*y), (4, 4) = 1}, spaceindices = lowercaselatin_is]

(5)

The problem appeared upon entering the matrix M below supposedly representing the alleged tetrad.

interface(imaginaryunit = i)

M := Matrix([[1/sqrt(2), 0, 0, 1/sqrt(2)], [-1/sqrt(2), 0, 0, 1/sqrt(2)], [0, 1/sqrt(2), -I*exp(-q*y), I], [0, 1/sqrt(2), I*exp(-q*y), -I]])

Matrix(%id = 18446744078162949534)

(6)

Each of the rows of this matrix is supposed to be one of the null vectors [l, n, m, conjugate(m)]. Before setting this alleged tetrad, Maple was asked to settle the nature of it, and the answer was that M was not a tetrad! With the Physics Updates v.857, a more detailed message was issued:

IsTetrad(M)

`Warning, the given components form a`*null*`tetrad, `*`with a contravariant spacetime index`*`, only if you change the signature from `*`- - - +`*` to `*`+ - - -`*`. 
You can do that by entering (copy and paste): `*Setup(signature = "+ - - -")

 

false

(7)

So there were actually three problems:

1. 

The entered entity was a null tetrad, while the default of the Physics package is an orthonormal tetrad. This can be seen in the form of the tetrad metric, or using the library commands:

eta_[]

Physics:-Tetrads:-eta_[a, b] = Matrix(%id = 18446744078354552462)

(8)

Library:-IsOrthonormalTetradMetric()

true

(9)

Library:-IsNullTetradMetric()

false

(10)
2. 

The matrix M would only be a tetrad if the spacetime index is contravariant. On the other hand, the command IsTetrad will return true only when M represents a tetrad with both indices covariant. For  instance, if the command IsTetrad  is issued about the tetrad automatically computed by Maple, but is passed the matrix corresponding to "`&efr;`[a]^(mu)"  with the spacetime index contravariant,  false is returned:

"e_[a,~mu, matrix]"

Physics:-Tetrads:-e_[a, `~&mu;`] = Matrix(%id = 18446744078297840926)

(11)

"IsTetrad(rhs(?))"

Typesetting[delayDotProduct](`Warning, the given components form a`*orthonormal*`tetrad only if the spacetime index is contravariant. 
You can construct a tetrad with a covariant spacetime index by entering (copy and paste): `, Matrix(4, 4, {(1, 1) = 1, (1, 2) = 0, (1, 3) = 0, (1, 4) = 0, (2, 1) = 0, (2, 2) = 1, (2, 3) = 0, (2, 4) = 0, (3, 1) = 0, (3, 2) = 0, (3, 3) = sqrt(2)*exp(-q*y), (3, 4) = -sqrt(2), (4, 1) = 0, (4, 2) = 0, (4, 3) = 0, (4, 4) = 1}), true).rhs(g[])

 

false

(12)
3. 

The matrix M corresponds to a tetrad with different signature, (+---), instead of Maple's default (---+). Although these two signatures represent the same physics, they differ in the ordering of rows and columns: the timelike component is respectively in positions 1 and 4.

 

The issue, then, became how to correct the matrix M to be a valid tetrad: either change the setup, or change the matrix M. Below the two courses of action are provided.

 

First the simplest: change the settings. According to the message (7), setting the tetrad to be null, changing the signature to be (+---) and indicating that M represents a tetrad with its spacetime index contravariant would suffice:

Setup(tetradmetric = null, signature = "+---")

[signature = `+ - - -`, tetradmetric = {(1, 2) = 1, (3, 4) = -1}]

(13)

The null tetrad metric is now as in the reference used.

eta_[]

Physics:-Tetrads:-eta_[a, b] = Matrix(%id = 18446744078298386174)

(14)

Checking now with the spacetime index contravariant

e_[a, `~&mu;`] = M

Physics:-Tetrads:-e_[a, `~&mu;`] = Matrix(%id = 18446744078162949534)

(15)

At this point, the command IsTetrad  provided with the equation (15), where the left-hand side has the information that the spacetime index is contravariant

"IsTetrad(?)"

`Type of tetrad: `*null

 

true

(16)

Great! one can now set the tetrad M exactly as entered, without changing anything else. In the next line it will only be necessary to indicate that the spacetime index, mu, is contravariant.

Setup(e_[a, `~&mu;`] = M, quiet)

[tetrad = {(1, 1) = -(1/2)*2^(1/2), (1, 3) = (1/2)*2^(1/2)*exp(q*y), (1, 4) = (1/2)*2^(1/2), (2, 1) = (1/2)*2^(1/2), (2, 3) = (1/2)*2^(1/2)*exp(q*y), (2, 4) = (1/2)*2^(1/2), (3, 2) = -(1/2)*2^(1/2), (3, 3) = ((1/2)*I)*exp(q*y), (3, 4) = 0, (4, 2) = -(1/2)*2^(1/2), (4, 3) = -((1/2)*I)*exp(q*y), (4, 4) = 0}]

(17)

 

The tetrad is now the matrix M. In addition to checking this tetrad making use of the IsTetrad command, it is also possible to check the definitions of tetrads and null vectors using TensorArray.

e_[definition]

Physics:-Tetrads:-e_[a, `&mu;`]*Physics:-Tetrads:-e_[b, `~&mu;`] = Physics:-Tetrads:-eta_[a, b]

(18)

TensorArray(Physics:-Tetrads:-e_[a, `&mu;`]*Physics:-Tetrads:-e_[b, `~&mu;`] = Physics:-Tetrads:-eta_[a, b], simplifier = simplify)

Matrix(%id = 18446744078353048270)

(19)

For the null vectors:

l_[definition]

Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[`~mu`] = 0, Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-n_[`~mu`] = 1, Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-m_[`~mu`] = 0, Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-mb_[`~mu`] = 0, Physics:-g_[mu, nu] = Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-n_[nu]+Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[nu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-n_[mu]-Physics:-Tetrads:-m_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-mb_[nu]-Physics:-Tetrads:-m_[nu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-mb_[mu]

(20)

TensorArray([Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[`~mu`] = 0, Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-n_[`~mu`] = 1, Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-m_[`~mu`] = 0, Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-mb_[`~mu`] = 0, Physics[g_][mu, nu] = Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-n_[nu]+Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[nu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-n_[mu]-Physics:-Tetrads:-m_[mu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-mb_[nu]-Physics:-Tetrads:-m_[nu]*Physics:-Tetrads:-mb_[mu]], simplifier = simplify)

[0 = 0, 1 = 1, 0 = 0, 0 = 0, Matrix(%id = 18446744078414241910)]

(21)

From its Weyl scalars, this tetrad is already in the canonical form for a spacetime of Petrov type "D": only `&Psi;__2` <> 0

PetrovType()

"D"

(22)

Weyl[scalars]

psi__0 = 0, psi__1 = 0, psi__2 = -(1/6)*q^2, psi__3 = 0, psi__4 = 0

(23)

Attempting to transform it into canonicalform returns the tetrad (17) itself

TransformTetrad(canonicalform)

Matrix(%id = 18446744078396685478)

(24)

Let's now obtain the correct tetrad without changing the signature as done in (13).

Start by changing the signature back to "(- - - +)"

Setup(signature = "---+")

[signature = `- - - +`]

(25)

So again, M is not a tetrad, even if the spacetime index is specified as contravariant.

IsTetrad(e_[a, `~&mu;`] = M)

`Warning, the given components form a`*null*`tetrad, `*`with a contravariant spacetime index`*`, only if you change the signature from `*`- - - +`*` to `*`+ - - -`*`. 
You can do that by entering (copy and paste): `*Setup(signature = "+ - - -")

 

false

(26)

By construction, the tetrad M has its rows formed by the null vectors with the ordering [l, n, m, conjugate(m)]. To understand what needs to be changed in M, define those vectors, independent of the null vectors [l_, n_, m_, mb_] (with underscore) that come with the Tetrads package.

Define(l[mu], n[mu], m[mu], mb[mu], quiet)

and set their components using the matrix M taking into account that its spacetime index is contravariant, and equating the rows of M  using the ordering [l, n, m, conjugate(m)]:

`~`[`=`]([l[`~&mu;`], n[`~&mu;`], m[`~&mu;`], mb[`~&mu;`]], [seq(M[j, 1 .. 4], j = 1 .. 4)])

[l[`~&mu;`] = Vector[row](%id = 18446744078368885086), n[`~&mu;`] = Vector[row](%id = 18446744078368885206), m[`~&mu;`] = Vector[row](%id = 18446744078368885326), mb[`~&mu;`] = Vector[row](%id = 18446744078368885446)]

(27)

"Define(op(?))"

`Defined objects with tensor properties`

 

{Physics:-D_[mu], Physics:-Dgamma[mu], Physics:-Psigma[mu], Physics:-Ricci[mu, nu], Physics:-Riemann[mu, nu, alpha, beta], Physics:-Weyl[mu, nu, alpha, beta], Physics:-d_[mu], Physics:-Tetrads:-e_[a, mu], Physics:-Tetrads:-eta_[a, b], Physics:-g_[mu, nu], Physics:-gamma_[i, j], Physics:-Tetrads:-gamma_[a, b, c], l[mu], Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu], Physics:-Tetrads:-lambda_[a, b, c], m[mu], Physics:-Tetrads:-m_[mu], mb[mu], Physics:-Tetrads:-mb_[mu], n[mu], Physics:-Tetrads:-n_[mu], Physics:-Christoffel[mu, nu, alpha], Physics:-Einstein[mu, nu], Physics:-LeviCivita[alpha, beta, mu, nu], Physics:-SpaceTimeVector[mu](X)}

(28)

Check the covariant components of these vectors towards comparing them with the lines of the Maple's tetrad `&efr;`[a, mu]

l[], n[], m[], mb[]

l[mu] = Array(%id = 18446744078298368710), n[mu] = Array(%id = 18446744078298365214), m[mu] = Array(%id = 18446744078298359558), mb[mu] = Array(%id = 18446744078298341734)

(29)

This shows the [l_, n_, m_, mb_] null vectors (with underscore) that come with Tetrads package

e_[nullvectors]

Physics:-Tetrads:-l_[mu] = Vector[row](%id = 18446744078354520414), Physics:-Tetrads:-n_[mu] = Vector[row](%id = 18446744078354520534), Physics:-Tetrads:-m_[mu] = Vector[row](%id = 18446744078354520654), Physics:-Tetrads:-mb_[mu] = Vector[row](%id = 18446744078354520774)

(30)

So (29) computed from M is the same as (30) computed from Maple's tetrad.

But, from (30) and the form of Maple's tetrad

e_[]

Physics:-Tetrads:-e_[a, mu] = Matrix(%id = 18446744078297844182)

(31)

for the current signature

Setup(signature)

[signature = `- - - +`]

(32)

we see the ordering of the null vectors is [n, m, mb, l], not [l, n, m, mb] used in [1] with the signature (+ - - -). So the adjustment required in  M, resulting in "M^( ')", consists of reordering M's rows to be [n, m, mb, l]

`#msup(mi("M"),mrow(mo("&InvisibleTimes;"),mo("&apos;")))` := simplify(Matrix(4, map(Library:-TensorComponents, [n[mu], m[mu], mb[mu], l[mu]])))

Matrix(%id = 18446744078414243230)

(33)

IsTetrad(`#msup(mi("M"),mrow(mo("&InvisibleTimes;"),mo("&apos;")))`)

`Type of tetrad: `*null

 

true

(34)

Comparing "M^( ')" with the tetrad `&efr;`[a, mu]computed by Maple ((24) and (31), they are actually the same.

References

[1]. Rainer Burghardt, "Constructing the Godel Universe", the arxiv gr-qc/0106070 2001.

[2]. Frank Grave and Michael Buser, "Visiting the Gödel Universe",  IEEE Trans Vis Comput GRAPH, 14(6):1563-70, 2008.


 

Download Godel_universe_and_Tedrads.mw


In a recent question in Mapleprimes, a spacetime (metric) solution to Einstein's equations, from chapter 27 of the book of Exact Solutions to Einstein's equations [1] was discussed. One of the issues was about computing a tetrad for that solution [27, 37, 1] such that the corresponding Weyl scalars are in canonical form. This post illustrates how to do that, with precisely that spacetime metric solution, in two different ways: 1) automatically, all in one go, and 2) step-by-step. The step-by-step computation is useful to verify results and also to compute different forms of the tetrads or Weyl scalars. The computation below is performed using the latest version of the Maplesoft Physics Updates.

 

with(Physics)

Physics:-Version()

`The "Physics Updates" version in the MapleCloud is 851 and is the same as the version installed in this computer, created 2020, October 19, 13:47 hours Pacific Time.`

(1)

The starting point is this image of page 421 of the book of Exact Solutions to Einstein's equations, formulas (27.37)

 

Load the solution [27, 37, 1] from Maple's database of solutions to Einstein's equations

g_[[27, 37, 1]]

_______________________________________________________

 

`Systems of spacetime coordinates are:`*{X = (z, zb, r, u)}

 

`Default differentiation variables for d_, D_ and dAlembertian are:`*{X = (z, zb, r, u)}

 

`The `*`Robinson and Trautman (1962)`*` metric in coordinates `*[z, zb, r, u]

 

`Parameters: `*[P(z, zb, u), H(X)]

 

"`Comments: ` admits geodesic, shearfree, twistfree null congruence, rho=-1/r=rho_b"

 

`Resetting the signature of spacetime from `*`- - - +`*` to `*`+ + + -`*` in order to match the signature in the database of metrics`

 

_______________________________________________________

 

`Setting `*lowercaselatin_is*` letters to represent `*space*` indices`

 

Physics:-g_[mu, nu] = Matrix(%id = 18446744078276690638)

(2)

"CompactDisplay(?)"

H(X)*`will now be displayed as`*H

 

P(z, zb, u)*`will now be displayed as`*P

(3)

The assumptions on the metric's parameters are

Assume(P(z, zb, u) > 0, (H(X))::real, r >= 0)

 

The line element is as shown in the second line of the image above

g_[lineelement]

2*r^2*Physics:-d_(z)*Physics:-d_(zb)/P(z, zb, u)^2-2*Physics:-d_(r)*Physics:-d_(u)-2*H(X)*Physics:-d_(u)^2

(4)

Load Tetrads

with(Tetrads)

_______________________________________________________

 

`Setting `*lowercaselatin_ah*` letters to represent `*tetrad*` indices`

 

((`Defined as tetrad tensors `*`see <a href='http://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/search.aspx?term=Physics,tetrads`*`,' target='_new'>?Physics,tetrads`*`,</a> `*`&efr;`[a, mu]*`, `)*eta[a, b]*`, `*gamma[a, b, c]*`, `)*lambda[a, b, c]

 

((`Defined as spacetime tensors representing the NP null vectors of the tetrad formalism `*`see <a href='http://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/search.aspx?term=Physics,tetrads`*`,' target='_new'>?Physics,tetrads`*`,</a> `*l[mu]*`, `)*n[mu]*`, `*m[mu]*`, `)*conjugate(m[mu])

 

_______________________________________________________

(5)

The Petrov type of this spacetime solution is

PetrovType()

"II"

(6)

The null tetrad computed by the Maple system using a general algorithms is

Setup(tetrad = null)

e_[]

Physics:-Tetrads:-e_[a, mu] = Matrix(%id = 18446744078178770326)

(7)

 

According to the help page TransformTetrad , the canonical form of the Weyl scalars for each different Petrov type is

 

So for type II, when the tetrad is in canonical form, we expect only `&Psi;__2` and `&Psi;__3` different from 0. For the tetrad computed automatically, however, the scalars are

Weyl[scalars]

psi__0 = -P(z, zb, u)*(2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))+P(z, zb, u)*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z)))/(r^2*(H(X)^2+1)^(1/2)), psi__1 = ((1/2)*I)*(-(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*P(z, zb, u)^2*r+2*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(H(X), z))-(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*r+(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*r*P(z, zb, u))/(P(z, zb, u)*r^2*(H(X)^2+1)^(1/4)), psi__2 = (1/6)*((diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))-2*(diff(H(X), r))*r-2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)+2*H(X))/r^2, psi__3 = 0, psi__4 = 0

(8)

The question is, how to bring the tetrad `&efr;`[a, mu] (equation (7)) into canonical form. The plan for that is outlined in Chapter 7, by Chandrasekhar, page 388, of the book "General Relativity, an Einstein centenary survey", edited by S.W. Hawking and W.Israel. In brief, for Petrov type II, use a transformation ofClass[2] to make Psi[0] = `&Psi;__1` and `&Psi;__1` = 0, then a transformation of Class[1] making Psi[4] = 0, finally use a transformation of Class[3] making Psi[3] = 1. For an explanation of these transformations see the help page for TransformTetrad . This plan, however, is applicable if and only if the starting tetrad results in `&psi;__4` <> 0, which we see in (8) it is not the case, so we need, in addition, before applying this plan, to perform a transformation of Class[1] making `&psi;__4` <> 0.

 

In what follows, the transformations mentioned are first performed automatically, in one go, letting the computer deduce each intermediate transformation, by passing to TransformTetrad the optional argument canonicalform. Then, the same result is obtained by transforming the starting tetrad  one step at at time, arriving at the same Weyl scalars. That illustrates well both how to get the result exploiting advanced functionality but also how to verify the result performing each step, and also how to get any desired different form of the Weyl scalars.

 

Although it is possible to perform both computations, automatically and step-by-step, departing from the tetrad (7), that tetrad and the corresponding Weyl scalars (8) have radicals, making the readability of the formulas at each step less clear. Both computations, can be presented in more readable form without radicals departing from the tetrad shown in the book, that is

e_[a, mu] = (Matrix(4, 4, {(1, 1) = 0, (1, 2) = 0, (1, 3) = 0, (1, 4) = -1, (2, 1) = 0, (2, 2) = r/P(z, zb, u), (2, 3) = 0, (2, 4) = 0, (3, 1) = r/P(z, zb, u), (3, 2) = 0, (3, 3) = 0, (3, 4) = 0, (4, 1) = 0, (4, 2) = 0, (4, 3) = -1, (4, 4) = -H(X)}))

Physics:-Tetrads:-e_[a, mu] = Matrix(%id = 18446744078621688766)

(9)

"IsTetrad(?)"

`Type of tetrad: `*null

 

true

(10)

The corresponding Weyl scalars free of radicals are

"WeylScalars(?)"

psi__0 = P(z, zb, u)*(2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))+P(z, zb, u)*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z)))/r^2, psi__1 = -(1/2)*(-(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*P(z, zb, u)^2*r+2*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(H(X), z))-(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*r+(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*r*P(z, zb, u))/(r^2*P(z, zb, u)), psi__2 = -(1/6)*(-(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+2*(diff(H(X), r))*r-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))+2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)-2*H(X))/r^2, psi__3 = 0, psi__4 = 0

(11)

So set this tetrad as the starting point

"Setup(?)"

[tetrad = {(1, 4) = -1, (2, 2) = r/P(z, zb, u), (3, 1) = r/P(z, zb, u), (4, 3) = -1, (4, 4) = -H(X)}]

(12)


All the transformations performed automatically, in one go

 

To arrive in one go, automatically, to a tetrad whose Weyl scalars are in canonical form as in (31), use the optional argument canonicalform:

T__5 := TransformTetrad(canonicalform)

WeylScalars(T__5)

psi__0 = 0, psi__1 = 0, psi__2 = -(1/6)*(-(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+2*(diff(H(X), r))*r-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))+2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)-2*H(X))/r^2, psi__3 = 1, psi__4 = 0

(13)

Note the length of T__5

length(T__5)

58242

(14)

That length corresponds to several pages long. That happens frequently, you get Weyl scalars with a minimum of residual invariance, at the cost of a more complicated tetrad.

 

The transformations step-by-step leading to the same canonical form of the Weyl scalars

 

Step 0

 

As mentioned above, to apply the plan outlined by Chandrasekhar, the starting point needs to be a tetrad with `&Psi;__4` <> 0, not the case of (9), so in this step 0 we use a transformation of Class[1] making `&psi;__4` <> 0. This transformation introduces a complex parameter E and to get `&psi;__4` <> 0 any value of E suffices. We use E = 1:

TransformTetrad(nullrotationwithfixedl_)

Matrix(%id = 18446744078634914990)

(15)

"`T__0` := eval(?,E=1)"

Matrix(%id = 18446744078634940646)

(16)

Indeed, for this tetrad, `&Psi;__4` <> 0:

WeylScalars(T__0)[-1]

psi__4 = ((diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2*P(z, zb, u)+P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^2+2*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*P(z, zb, u)^2*r+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))*P(z, zb, u)+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*r-4*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(H(X), z))-2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)^2-2*(diff(H(X), r))*P(z, zb, u)*r-2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*r*P(z, zb, u)+2*H(X)*P(z, zb, u))/(r^2*P(z, zb, u))

(17)

Step 1

Next is a transformation of Class__2 to make `&Psi;__0` = 0, that in the case of Petrov type II also implies on `&Psi;__1` = 0.According to the the help page TransformTetrad , this transformation introduces a parameter B that, according to the plan outlined by Chandrasekhar in Chapter 7 page 388, is one of the two identical roots (out of the four roots) of the principalpolynomial. To see the principal polynomial, or, directly, its roots you can use the PetrovType  command:

PetrovType(principalroots = 'R')

"II"

(18)

The first two are the same and equal to -1

R[1 .. 2]

[-1, -1]

(19)

So the transformed tetrad T__1 is

T__1 := eval(TransformTetrad(T__0, nullrotationwithfixedn_), B = -1)

Matrix(%id = 18446744078641721462)

(20)

Check this result and the corresponding Weyl scalars to verify that we now have `&Psi;__0` = 0 and `&Psi;__1` = 0

IsTetrad(T__1)

`Type of tetrad: `*null

 

true

(21)

WeylScalars(T__1)[1 .. 2]

psi__0 = 0, psi__1 = 0

(22)

Step 2

Next is a transformation of Class__1 that makes `&Psi;__4` = 0. This transformation introduces a parameter E, that according to Chandrasekhar's plan can be taken equal to one of the roots of Weyl scalar `&Psi;__4`that corresponds to the transformed tetrad. So we need to proceed in three steps:

a. 

transform the tetrad introducing a parameter E in the tetrad's components

b. 

compute the Weyl scalars for that transformed tetrad

c. 

take `&Psi;__4` = 0 and solve for E

d. 

apply the resulting value of E to the transformed tetrad obtained in step a.

 

a.Transform the tetrad and for simplicity take E real

T__2 := eval(TransformTetrad(T__1, nullrotationwithfixedl_), conjugate(E) = E)

Matrix(%id = 18446744078624751238)

(23)

"IsTetrad(?)"

`Type of tetrad: `*null

 

true

(24)

b. Compute `&Psi;__4` for this tetrad

simplify(WeylScalars(T__2)[-1])

psi__4 = (r^2*P(z, zb, u)*(E-1)^2*(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))-2*r*P(z, zb, u)^2*(E-1)*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))+P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))-2*P(z, zb, u)^2*(E-1)^2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))+2*r*P(z, zb, u)*(E-1)*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))-2*r*P(z, zb, u)*(E-1)^2*(diff(H(X), r))+4*P(z, zb, u)^2*(E+(1/2)*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))-1)*(diff(H(X), z))+2*((P(z, zb, u)*(E-1)*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))-(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*r)*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))+H(X)*P(z, zb, u)*(E-1))*(E-1))/(r^2*P(z, zb, u))

(25)

c. Solve `&Psi;__4` = 0 discarding the case E = 0 which implies on no transformation

simplify(solve({rhs(psi__4 = (r^2*P(z, zb, u)*(E-1)^2*(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))-2*r*P(z, zb, u)^2*(E-1)*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))+P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))-2*P(z, zb, u)^2*(E-1)^2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))+2*r*P(z, zb, u)*(E-1)*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))-2*r*P(z, zb, u)*(E-1)^2*(diff(H(X), r))+4*P(z, zb, u)^2*(E+(1/2)*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))-1)*(diff(H(X), z))+2*((P(z, zb, u)*(E-1)*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))-(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*r)*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))+H(X)*P(z, zb, u)*(E-1))*(E-1))/(r^2*P(z, zb, u))) = 0, E <> 0}, {E}, explicit)[1])

{E = ((diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2*P(z, zb, u)+(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*P(z, zb, u)^2*r-2*(diff(H(X), r))*P(z, zb, u)*r-(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*r*P(z, zb, u)+(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*r-2*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(H(X), z))-2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)^2+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))*P(z, zb, u)+2*H(X)*P(z, zb, u)+(-P(z, zb, u)^4*((diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))-2*(diff(H(X), r))*r-2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)+2*H(X))*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))+P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))^2*r^2+(-2*r^2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3+2*r^2*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))-4*r*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^4)*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))^2*r^2+(-2*r^2*P(z, zb, u)*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))+4*r*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3)*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))+4*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))+4*(diff(H(X), z))^2*P(z, zb, u)^4+4*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*((diff(H(X), r))*P(z, zb, u)*r-(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))*P(z, zb, u)-(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*r-H(X)*P(z, zb, u))*(diff(H(X), z))+(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))^2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))^2*r^2)^(1/2))/(P(z, zb, u)*((diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))-2*(diff(H(X), r))*r-2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)+2*H(X)))}

(26)

d. Apply this result to the tetrad (23). In doing so, do not display the result, just measure its length (corresponds to two+ pages)

T__3 := simplify(eval(T__2, {E = ((diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2*P(z, zb, u)+(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*P(z, zb, u)^2*r-2*(diff(H(X), r))*P(z, zb, u)*r-(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*r*P(z, zb, u)+(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*r-2*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(H(X), z))-2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)^2+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))*P(z, zb, u)+2*H(X)*P(z, zb, u)+(-P(z, zb, u)^4*((diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))-2*(diff(H(X), r))*r-2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)+2*H(X))*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))+P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))^2*r^2+(-2*r^2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3+2*r^2*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))-4*r*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^4)*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))^2*r^2+(-2*r^2*P(z, zb, u)*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))+4*r*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3)*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))+4*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))+4*(diff(H(X), z))^2*P(z, zb, u)^4+4*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*((diff(H(X), r))*P(z, zb, u)*r-(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))*P(z, zb, u)-(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*r-H(X)*P(z, zb, u))*(diff(H(X), z))+(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))^2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))^2*r^2)^(1/2))/(P(z, zb, u)*((diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))-2*(diff(H(X), r))*r-2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)+2*H(X)))}[1]))

length(T__3)

12589

(27)

Check the scalars, we expect `&Psi;__0` = `&Psi;__1` and `&Psi;__1` = `&Psi;__4` and `&Psi;__4` = 0

WeylScalars(T__3); %[1 .. 2], %[-1]

psi__0 = 0, psi__1 = 0, psi__4 = 0

(28)

Step 3

Use a transformation of Class[3] making Psi[3] = 1. Such a transformation changes Psi[3]^` '` = A*exp(-I*Omega)*Psi[3], where we need to take A*exp(-I*Omega) = 1/`&Psi;__3`, and without loss of generality we can take Omega = 0.

Check first the value of `&Psi;__3` in the last tetrad computed

WeylScalars(T__3)[4]

psi__3 = (1/2)*(-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2-P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))*(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))^2*r^2+4*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), r))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3*r+2*(diff(H(X), r))*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))*r-4*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))^2*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3+4*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))-4*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*r+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*r^2-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))+2*P(z, zb, u)^5*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))-2*P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*r^2+4*(diff(H(X), z))^2*P(z, zb, u)^4-4*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^2*r-4*H(X)*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3+4*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*r+(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))^2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))^2*r^2-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*P(z, zb, u)*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*r^2-2*H(X)*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))+P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))^2*r^2)^(1/2)/(r^2*P(z, zb, u))

(29)

So, the transformed tetrad T__4 to which corresponds Weyl scalars in canonical form, with `&Psi;__0` = `&Psi;__1` and `&Psi;__1` = `&Psi;__4` and `&Psi;__4` = 0 and `&Psi;__3` = 1, is

T__4 := simplify(eval(TransformTetrad(T__3, boostsn_l_plane), A = 1/rhs(psi__3 = (1/2)*(-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2-P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))*(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))^2*r^2+4*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), r))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3*r+2*(diff(H(X), r))*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))*r-4*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))^2*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3+4*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))-4*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*r+2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*r^2-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))+2*P(z, zb, u)^5*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))-2*P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*(diff(diff(H(X), r), z))*r^2+4*(diff(H(X), z))^2*P(z, zb, u)^4-4*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^2*r-4*H(X)*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3+4*(diff(H(X), z))*P(z, zb, u)^3*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*r+(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))^2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))^2*r^2-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), u))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*P(z, zb, u)*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))*r^2-2*H(X)*P(z, zb, u)^4*(diff(diff(H(X), z), z))+P(z, zb, u)^2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), u), z))^2*r^2)^(1/2)/(r^2*P(z, zb, u)))))

IsTetrad(T__4)

`Type of tetrad: `*null

 

true

(30)

WeylScalars(T__4)

psi__0 = 0, psi__1 = 0, psi__2 = -(1/6)*(-(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+2*(diff(H(X), r))*r+2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))-2*H(X))/r^2, psi__3 = 1, psi__4 = 0

(31)

These are the same scalars computed in one go in (13)

psi__0 = 0, psi__1 = 0, psi__2 = -(1/6)*(-(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+2*(diff(H(X), r))*r-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))+2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)-2*H(X))/r^2, psi__3 = 1, psi__4 = 0

psi__0 = 0, psi__1 = 0, psi__2 = -(1/6)*(-(diff(diff(H(X), r), r))*r^2+2*(diff(H(X), r))*r-2*(diff(P(z, zb, u), z))*(diff(P(z, zb, u), zb))+2*(diff(diff(P(z, zb, u), z), zb))*P(z, zb, u)-2*H(X))/r^2, psi__3 = 1, psi__4 = 0

(32)

``


 

Download The_metric_[27_37_1]_in_canonical_form.mw

Edgardo S. Cheb-Terrab
Physics, Differential Equations and Mathematical Functions, Maplesoft

Hi,
Some people using the Windows platform have had problems installing MapleCloud packages, including the Maplesoft Physics Updates. This problem does not happen in Macintosh or Linux/Unix, also does not happen with all Windows computers but with some of them, and is not a problem of the MapleCloud packages themselves, but a problem of the installer of packages.

I understand that a solution to this problem will be presented within an upcoming Maple dot release.

Meantime, there is a solution by installing a helper library; after that, MapleCloud packages install without problems in all Windows machines. So whoever is having trouble installing MapleCloud packages in Windows and prefers not to wait until that dot release, instead wants to install this helper library, please email me at physics@maplesoft.com

Edgardo S. Cheb-Terrab
Physics, Differential Equations and Mathematical Functions, Maplesoft

Caution, certain kinds of earlier input can affect the results from using the 2D Input syntax for operator assignment.

kernelopts(version)

`Maple 2020.1, X86 64 LINUX, Jun 8 2020, Build ID 1474533`

restart

f := proc (x) options operator, arrow; sqrt(x) end proc


The following now produces a remember-table assignment,
instead of assigning a procedure to name f, even though by default
     Typesetting:-Settings(functionassign)
is set to true.

"f(x):=x^(2)*sin(x)"

x^2*sin(x)

f(t)

t^(1/2)

f(1.4), 1.4^2*sin(1.4)

1.183215957, 1.931481471

restart

NULL


With the previous line of code commented-out the following
line assigns a procedure to name f, as expected.

If you uncomment the previous line, and re-execute the whole
worksheet using !!! from the menubar, then the following will
do a remember-table assignment instead.

"f(x):=x^(2)*sin(x)"

proc (x) options operator, arrow, function_assign; x^2*sin(x) end proc

f(t)

t^2*sin(t)

f(1.4), 1.4^2*sin(1.4)

1.931481471, 1.931481471

``

Download operator_assignment_2dmath.mw

We have just released an update to Maple, Maple 2020.1.1. This update includes the following:

  • Correction to a problem that occurred when printing or exporting documents to PDF. If the document included a 3-D plot, nearby text was sometimes missing from the printed/exported document.
  • Correction to an issue that prevented users from installing between-release updates to the Physics package

This update is available through Tools>Check for Updates in Maple, and is also available from our website on the Maple 2020.1.1 download page. If you are a MapleSim user, you can obtain this update from the corresponding MapleSim menu or MapleSim 2020.1.1  download page.

In particular, please note that this update fixes the problems reported on MaplePrimes in Maple 2020.1 issue with print to PDF  and installing the Maplesoft Physics updates. As always, we appreciate the feedback.

Hello each and everyone,

I am still not able to install/update the Physics package and this since version 713.

I think the phenomenom happens when Maple 2020 was updated to version 2020.1

The 2 ways fail :

1) Physics:-Version(latest)  ==> kernel crashes (lost connection)

2) via the Cloud : it's even worse... "installation" lasts forever (i usually break it after 15 (!) minutes)

I removed totally Maple 2020.1 and reinstalled it, the problem is still there.

I wonder when Maplesoft developpers will fix this problem whitch has been around for a long time now.

I do *not* want to do it by hand as one of this forum contributor suggested me a while ago.

I use the Physics paxkage intensively so i'm hampered in my work.

Kind regards to all.

Jean-Michel

One way to find the equation of an ellipse circumscribed around a triangle. In this case, we solve a linear system of equations, which is obtained after fixing the values of two variables ( t1 and t2). These are five equations: three equations of the second-order curve at three vertices of the triangle and two equations of a linear combination of the coordinates of the gradient of the curve equation.
The solving of system takes place in the ELS procedure. When solving, hyperboles appear, so the program has a filter. The filter passes the equations of ellipses based on by checking the values of the invariants of the second-order curves.
FOR_ELL_ТR_OUT_PROCE_F.mw  ( Fixed comments in the text  01, 08, 2020)

@ianmccr posted here about making help for a package using makehelp. Here I show how to do this with the HelpTools package.

The attached worksheet shows how to create the help database for the Orbitals package available at the Applications Center or in the Maple Cloud. The help pages were created as worksheets - start using an existing help page as a model - use View/Open Page As Worksheet and then save from there. The topics and other information are entered by adding Attributes under File/Document Properties - for example for the realY help page these are:

Active=false means a regular help page; Active=true means an example worksheet.

There may be several aliases, for example the cartesion help page also describes the fullcartesian command and so Alias is: Orbitals[fullcartesian],cartesian,fullcartesian and Keyword is: Orbitals,cartesian,fullcartesian

Once a worksheet is created for each help page they are assembled into the help database with the attached file. More information is in the attached file

Orbitals_Make_help_database.mw

MacDude posted a worksheet for creating help files using the makehelp command that I found very useful.  However, his worksheet created a table of contents that organized the command help pages under a single folder.  I wanted to create a help file table of contents with the commands organized into sub-folders under the main application folder. ie. Package Name,Folder Name, command. The help page for makehelp is not very informative; in particular the example that shows (purportedly) how to override the existing help pages with your own help file is very misleading.  Also, the description of the parameters to the browser option of the makehelp command is too vague. I needed an error message to tell me that the browser option expects parameters in the form List(Name,String).  In the end, I was able to get a folder/sub-folder structure using a structure [`Folder Name`,`Subfolder Name`,"Command"].  Sub-folders are sorted alphabetically. If anyone has a need, the attached worksheet shows how I created the table of contents structure. 

helpcode.mw

I like tweaking plots to get the look and feel I want, and luckily Maple has many plotting options that I often play with. Here, I visualize the same data several times, but each time with different styling.

First, some data.

restart:
data_1 := [[0,0],[1,2],[2,1.3],[3,6]]:
data_2 := [[0.5,3],[1,1],[2,5],[3,2]]:
data_3 := [[-0.5,3],[1.3,1],[2.5,5],[4.5,2]]:

This is the default look.

plot([data_1, data_2, data_3])

I think the darker background on this plot makes it easier to look at.

gray_grid :=
 background      = "LightGrey"
,color           = [ ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[150/255, 40 /255, 27 /255])
                    ,ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[0  /255, 0  /255, 0  /255])
                    ,ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[68 /255, 108/255, 179/255]) ]
,axes            = frame
,axis[2]         = [color = black, gridlines = [10, thickness = 1, color = ColorTools:-Color("RGB", [1, 1, 1])]]
,axis[1]         = [color = black, gridlines = [10, thickness = 1, color = ColorTools:-Color("RGB", [1, 1, 1])]]
,axesfont        = [Arial]
,labelfont       = [Arial]
,size            = [400*1.78, 400]
,labeldirections = [horizontal, vertical]
,filled          = false
,transparency    = 0
,thickness       = 5
,style           = line:

plot([data_1, data_2, data_3], gray_grid);

I call the next style Excel, for obvious reasons.

excel :=
 background      = white
,color           = [ ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[79/255,  129/255, 189/255])
                    ,ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[192/255, 80/255,   77/255])
                    ,ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[155/255, 187/255,  89/255])]
,axes            = frame
,axis[2]         = [gridlines = [10, thickness = 0, color = ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[134/255,134/255,134/255])]]
,font            = [Calibri]
,labelfont       = [Calibri]
,size            = [400*1.78, 400]
,labeldirections = [horizontal, vertical]
,transparency    = 0
,thickness       = 3
,style           = point
,symbol          = [soliddiamond, solidbox, solidcircle]
,symbolsize      = 15:

plot([data_1, data_2, data_3], excel)

This style makes the plot look a bit like the oscilloscope I have in my garage.

dark_gridlines :=
 background      = ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[0,0,0])
,color           = white
,axes            = frame
,linestyle       = [solid, dash, dashdot]
,axis            = [gridlines = [10, linestyle = dot, color = ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[0.5, 0.5, 0.5])]]
,font            = [Arial]
,size            = [400*1.78, 400]:

plot([data_1, data_2, data_3], dark_gridlines);

The colors in the next style remind me of an Autumn morning.

autumnal :=
 background      =  ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[236/255, 240/255, 241/255])
,color           = [  ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[144/255, 54/255, 24/255])
                     ,ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[105/255, 108/255, 51/255])
                     ,ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[131/255, 112/255, 82/255]) ]
,axes            = frame
,font            = [Arial]
,size            = [400*1.78, 400]
,filled          = true
,axis[2]         = [gridlines = [10, thickness = 1, color = white]]
,axis[1]         = [gridlines = [10, thickness = 1, color = white]]
,symbol          = solidcircle
,style           = point
,transparency    = [0.6, 0.4, 0.2]:

plot([data_1, data_2, data_3], autumnal);

In honor of a friend and ex-colleague, I call this style "The Swedish".

swedish :=
 background      = ColorTools:-Color("RGB", [0/255, 107/255, 168/255])
,color           = [ ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[169/255, 158/255, 112/255])
                    ,ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[126/255,  24/255,   9/255])
                    ,ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[254/255, 205/255,   0/255])]
,axes            = frame
,axis            = [gridlines = [10, color = ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[134/255,134/255,134/255])]]
,font            = [Arial]
,size            = [400*1.78, 400]
,labeldirections = [horizontal, vertical]
,filled          = false
,thickness       = 10:

plot([data_1, data_2, data_3], swedish);

This looks like a plot from a journal article.

experimental_data_mono :=

background       = white
,color           = black
,axes            = box
,axis            = [gridlines = [linestyle = dot, color = ColorTools:-Color("RGB",[0.5, 0.5, 0.5])]]
,font            = [Arial, 11]
,legendstyle     = [font = [Arial, 11]]
,size            = [400, 400]
,labeldirections = [horizontal, vertical]
,style           = point
,symbol          = [solidcircle, solidbox, soliddiamond]
,symbolsize      = [15,15,20]:

plot([data_1, data_2, data_3], experimental_data_mono, legend = ["Annihilation", "Authority", "Acceptance"]);

If you're willing to tinker a little bit, you can add some real character and personality to your visualizations. Try it!

I'd also be very interested to learn what you find attractive in a plot - please do let me know.

We have just released an update to Maple, Maple 2020.1.

Maple 2020.1 includes corrections and improvement to the mathematics engine, export to PDF, MATLAB connectivity, support for Ubuntu 20.04, and more.  We recommend that all Maple 2020 users install these updates.

This update is available through Tools>Check for Updates in Maple, and is also available from our website on the Maple 2020.1 download page, where you can also find more details.

In particular, please note that this update includes a fix to the SMTLIB problem reported on MaplePrimes. Thanks for the feedback!

 

We’re excited to announce a new version of MapleSim! The MapleSim 2020 family of products lets you build and test models faster than ever, including faster simulations, powerful new tools for machine builders, and expanded modeling capabilities. Improvements include:

  • Faster results, with more efficient models, faster simulations, and more powerful design tools.
  • Powerful new features for machine builders, with new components, improved visualizations, and automation-focused connectivity tools that make it faster than ever to build and test digital twins.
  • Improved modeling capabilities, with an extensive collection of updates to components, libraries, and analysis tools.
  • More realistic machine visualizations with an expanded Kinematic Cam Generation App.
  • New product: MapleSim Insight, giving machine builders powerful, simulation-based debugging and 3-D visualization capabilities that connect directly to common automation platforms.
  • New add-on library:  MapleSim Ropes and Pulleys Library for the easy creation of winch and pulley systems as part of your machine development. 

See What’s New in MapleSim 2020 for more information about these and other improvements!
 

This is my attempt to produce a subplot within a larger plot for magnifying data in a small region, and putting that subplot into the white space of the figure.
Based on the questions: How to insert a plot into another plot? and Inset figure in Maple, I wrote a couple of procedures that create sub-plots and allow the user to place the subplot window as he/she chooses. This avoids the graininess issues mentioned by acer in the second link (and experienced by me).

So far, I only have this completed for point plots, but using acer's method of piecewise functions posted in the plotin2b.mw of the second article, with the subplot function being defined only if it satisfies your conditions, would allow the subplot generating procedure to be generalized easily enough. But the data I'm working with all point plots, so that's the example here.

The basic idea  is to use one procedure to create boxes, make tickmarks on the expanded region, and make tickmark labels, combine all of those into one graph. Then create scaled and shifted versions of the data series, then make graphs of those. Lastly, combine them all into one picture.

Hope this helps someone who has to do the same.

Mapleprimes isn't inserting the contents, but here is the download of the file: SubPlotBoxesandVectorDataSeries.mw

 

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