kreevesetbu

5 Reputation

3 Badges

18 years, 42 days
Dr. Kevin Reeves is a professor of mathematics at East Texas Baptist University. His research interests include using technology to enhance the teaching of mathematics across the undergraduate curriculum. His dissertation and published research are in the areas of algebra, topology, and topological groups. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Southwestern Louisiana (now the University of Louisiana at Lafayette) in 1995.

MaplePrimes Activity


These are answers submitted by kreevesetbu

Thanks for the comments!  I was slowly coming to the realization that the function definition (whichever way I try to use that) was still defined in terms of the procedure of taking the integral with respect to x, and that means when a number (such as 2) is inserted in my function definition for x, it's treating it like taking the integral with respect that number, which of course makes no sense.

I'd really prefer not to have to switch variables throughout, as I'm wanting to have Maple work through the FTC idea as closely as possible to how we teach it in class.  But I'll definitely need to make sure we assign the function call after Maple has done the procedure, not as it's in the process.

Would this command do what you're looking for?

plot3d(x^2+y^2,x=-5..5,y=-sqrt(25-x^2)..sqrt(25-x^2))

When I've encountered this issue, it's usually because the domain over which I'm plotting is rectangular, but the function doesn't behave the way we expect with a rectangular domain.  So adjusting it usually fixes the problem.  I can't get this type of thing to work with the right-clicking options in document mode however.  It looks like you might have to type the command in as I've given it.

I just found one way around this issue, but there may still be better solutions I haven't discovered.  If I don't assign the function name in advance, but rather just have Maple calculate

int(x^2,x)

and then use right-clicking (I'm in Document mode) to assign this result to the name G(x), I am then able to evaluate G(2) and get 8/3 as an answer.

Any other thoughts?

Page 1 of 1