Paul

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14 years, 24 days
Paul DeMarco is the Director of Development at Maplesoft, a position that has him involved with technical planning and development of Maple and the various core technologies that use Maple as a computation engine. He joined Maplesoft in September 1996 while studying at the University of Waterloo in the CS/EEE program -- a track that combines core math and computer science courses with electrical engineering electives. Paul's development work in the Math and Kernel Groups over the years touches a wide variety of areas, including algorithms, data structures, and connectivity with other products. He is also involved with core Maple as well as Maple T.A.

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These are Posts that have been published by Paul

One of the most basic decisions a baseball manager has to make is how to arrange the batting order.  There are many heuristics and models for estimating the productivity of a given order.  My personal favourite is the use of simulation, but by far the most elegant solution from a mathematical perspective uses probability matrices and Markov chains.  An excellent treatment of this topic can be found in Dr. Joel S. Sokol's article,

 

An intersection in my neighbourhood, currently controlled by a 2-way stop, is under consideration to become a 4-way stop.  This means the traffic that currently has the right-of-way will be required to come to a complete stop, wheras previously they could have coasted down the hill, and accelerated up the other side.   Politics aside, I was curious to explore the following question:

 

                

3D Paper Physical Model

Classic Triangle Peg Board GameIn high school I was briefly fascinated by a triangular "jump all but one" game, commonly found at Cracker Barrel restaurants.  The basic premise is that any peg can "jump" over an adjacent peg to occupy the empty hole next to the jumped peg.  The jumped peg is then removed.  The goal is to continue jumping pegs until there is only one left.  


The instructions on the face of the Cracker Barrel version of this game say, "LEAVE ONLY ONE -- YOU'RE A GENIUS".  Wanting to claim the right to call myself a genius, unlike ordinary kids, who might just play the game a few times, I sat down on my Turbo-XT and started writing BASIC code.  The algorithm I came up with ran a bit slow, so I directed output to my printer and let it run over night.  In the morning the program was still chugging along.  I advanced the paper feed on the dot-matrix lineprinter -- the kind that used continuous feed paper with perforated edges and holes on each side.   Into view came 3 solutions represented by a string of numbers.   A quick check verified that I was now a genius.  

The following interaction with Maple's Excel link came to my attention today.  I thought it had many interesting points that lead to insights about Excel and Maple that are worth sharing. 

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