gulliet

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19 years, 29 days

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As you can see, running your code on my system ---Maple 12.02 64-bit Intel Mac OS X 10.5.6--- I have got the error message "too many recursions" from the command simplify. I suspect this is due to the absence of definition for the function Zetall.
restart;
with(Statistics); 
f := simplify(piecewise(`and`(k >= kmin, k::integer),
k^(lambda)/ZetaII(lambda, kmin), 0)); 
ND := Distribution(PDF = unapply(f, k)); 
X := RandomVariable(ND); Sample(X, 5);
%;
         f :=  /       (-lambda)                                   
               |      k                                            
               | --------------------      kmin <= k and k::integer
              <  ZetaII(lambda, kmin)                              
               |                                                   
               |          0                       otherwise        
               \                                                   
ND := module () export PDF, Type; option Distribution, Continuous; end module
Error, (in simplify) too many levels of recursion
> help("ZetaII");

Regards, --Jean-Marc
When one is asking for help about a homework question, it is good practice to show one's own attempts to solve it. In doing so, readers of this forum not only can suggest the right thing to do but explain why the original approch was flawed. Regards, --Jean-Marc P.S. You should not post the same question in different MaplePrimes's forums.
Toying around with implicitplot, I have found that the options gridrefine and crossingrefine yield a smoother plot than numpoints, at least to my taste :-)
restart; with(plots); 
x[0] := 0; y[0] := 0; 
implicitplot((x-x[0])^2/1.75^2+(y-y[0])^2/1.35^2 = 1, x = -2 .. 2, 
y = -2 .. 2, gridrefine = 2, crossingrefine = 2, scaling = constrained)
97_smoothellipse.jpeg Regards, --Jean-Marc
Toying around with implicitplot, I have found that the options gridrefine and crossingrefine yield a smoother plot than numpoints, at least to my taste :-)
restart; with(plots); 
x[0] := 0; y[0] := 0; 
implicitplot((x-x[0])^2/1.75^2+(y-y[0])^2/1.35^2 = 1, x = -2 .. 2, 
y = -2 .. 2, gridrefine = 2, crossingrefine = 2, scaling = constrained)
97_smoothellipse.jpeg Regards, --Jean-Marc
Thanks to Alec's comment, I have "discovered" a nice feature of Maple's interface (which might be old news for old-Maple timers)! I did change nothing when I copied and pasted starlight's code; however, Maple cleverly did so, automatically removing unneeded semicolons and transforming key words such as fi od into end if end do. For instance, 97_nicefeature.jpg Does anyone know whether some documentation ---say, describing what syntax errors are automatically taken care of--- exists about this feature and where is it located? Best regards, --Jean-Marc
Thanks to Alec's comment, I have "discovered" a nice feature of Maple's interface (which might be old news for old-Maple timers)! I did change nothing when I copied and pasted starlight's code; however, Maple cleverly did so, automatically removing unneeded semicolons and transforming key words such as fi od into end if end do. For instance, 97_nicefeature.jpg Does anyone know whether some documentation ---say, describing what syntax errors are automatically taken care of--- exists about this feature and where is it located? Best regards, --Jean-Marc
I guess this remark is more for the Maplesoft team, but is this update now available via Maple's automatic update feature and/or menu "Tools" -> "Check for Updates"? About two weeks ago, I discovered by accident ---while I was googling for some stuff about Maple--- that Maple 12.02 had been released few days before. Although some version tracker web sites were aware of it, the automatic update as well as the check for update features stubbornly that there were no new release. I downloaded and upgraded manually to version 12.02 (for Mac OS X) from 12.01. Regards, --Jean-Marc
Oops! My mistake, sorry about that. I did not fully test my "solution". Regards, -- Jean-Marc
Oops! My mistake, sorry about that. I did not fully test my "solution". Regards, -- Jean-Marc
A possible way is to use the context menu -- right-click on the plot -- and change the range of the axes. For instance, 97_Picture 1.png 97_Picture 2.png Regards, -- Jean-Marc
A possible way is to use the context menu -- right-click on the plot -- and change the range of the axes. For instance, 97_Picture 1.png 97_Picture 2.png Regards, -- Jean-Marc
> a, b := map(rhs, Y(0.1e-1)[2 .. 3])[];
             a, b := 0.989950166993563863, -1.00994983384860393
> a+b;
                                -0.0199996670
> a := 'a'; b := 'b';
> a := rhs(Y(0.1e-1)[2]);
                          a := 0.989950166993563863
> b := rhs(Y(0.1e-1)[3]);
                          b := -1.00994983384860393
> a+b;
                                -0.0199996670

Regards, -- Jean-Marc
> a, b := map(rhs, Y(0.1e-1)[2 .. 3])[];
             a, b := 0.989950166993563863, -1.00994983384860393
> a+b;
                                -0.0199996670
> a := 'a'; b := 'b';
> a := rhs(Y(0.1e-1)[2]);
                          a := 0.989950166993563863
> b := rhs(Y(0.1e-1)[3]);
                          b := -1.00994983384860393
> a+b;
                                -0.0199996670

Regards, -- Jean-Marc
Sure it is, but Maple's Physics package is really cool too (and the Vector subpackage is even cooler: coordinate free vectors and the like). Well, it might just be that coolness is in the eye of the beholder :-) Best regards, -- Jean-Marc
Sure it is, but Maple's Physics package is really cool too (and the Vector subpackage is even cooler: coordinate free vectors and the like). Well, it might just be that coolness is in the eye of the beholder :-) Best regards, -- Jean-Marc
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