gulliet

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With the new value of mu, it seems that fsolve failed to solve the system and, so, returns unevaluated.
restart: with(plots):
alpha:=Pi/3:
mu:=3.006*10^(-6):
rs:=((x+mu)^2+y^2)^0.5:
re:=((x+mu-1)^2+y^2)^0.5:
Q:=beta/10*(1-mu)*(cos(alpha))^2:
S:=(x+mu)*cos(alpha)+y*sin(alpha):
T:=-(x+mu)*sin(alpha)+y*cos(alpha):
eq1:=(1-mu)*(x+mu)/rs^3+mu*(x-mu+1)/re^3-x=Q*S/rs^3:
eq2:=(1-mu)*y/rs^3+mu*y/re^3-y=Q*T/rs^3:
plist:=[]:
for beta from 0 to 10 do 
  fsolve({eq1,eq2}, {x,y}); 
  xx:=eval(x,%); 
  yy:=eval(y,%%);
  plist:=[op(plist),[xx,yy,beta/10]]; 
end do:

Error, invalid input: eval received
fsolve({.9999969940*y/((x+0.3006000000e-5)^2+y^2)^1.5
+0.3006000000e-5*y/((x-.9999969940)^2+y^2)^1.5-y = 0.,
.9999969940*(x+0.3006000000e-5)/((x+0.3006000000e-5)^2+y^2)^1.5
+0.3006000000e-5*(x+.9999969940)/((x-.9999969940)^2+y^2)^1.5-x
= 0.}, {x, y}), which is not valid for its 2nd argument, eqns

kernelopts(version);
        Maple 12.02, APPLE UNIVERSAL OSX, Dec 10 2008 Build ID 377066
Regards, --Jean-Marc
I believe that the geom3d package provides the functions you need. See for help("geom3d") more info. For instance, 97_pyramiddraw3d.jpg Regards, --Jean-Marc
I believe that the geom3d package provides the functions you need. See for help("geom3d") more info. For instance, 97_pyramiddraw3d.jpg Regards, --Jean-Marc
As written, the function printf expects an integer as second argument, which will replace the place holder %d. (This is the same syntax as the same function in the C programming language.) You should have a look at the examples for printf in the online help. Also, it is not clear, at least for me, what you what as output. Here are some examples:
> printf("No Roots Between The Interval %d \n", [a, b]);

No Roots Between The Interval 

Error, (in fprintf) integer expected for integer format

> printf("No Roots Between The Interval %s \n", "[a,b]");

No Roots Between The Interval [a,b] 

> a := 1; b := 2; printf("No Roots Between The Interval [%d, %d]\n", a, b);

No Roots Between The Interval [1, 2]

> help("printf");

Regards, --Jean-Marc
I hope you can click on the links to the left of the descriptions. :)

Clicking is possible. The images seem to be missing, however. Here is how is rendered your message on my system. 97_precalcbrokenlink1.jpg If I click, say, on the first link, I reach this page: 97_precalcbrokenlink2.jpg And if I click on the blue square with the question mark, the following page is displayed: 97_precalcbrokenlink3.jpg Regards, --Jean-Marc

I hope you can click on the links to the left of the descriptions. :)
Clicking is possible. The images seem to be missing, however. Here is how is rendered your message on my system. 97_precalcbrokenlink1.jpg If I click, say, on the first link, I reach this page: 97_precalcbrokenlink2.jpg And if I click on the blue square with the question mark, the following page is displayed: 97_precalcbrokenlink3.jpg Regards, --Jean-Marc
The second argument of solve is where one specify the variables, so whatever is not explicily mentioned here is deemed to be constant. For instance, below we solve for the variables a and b, keeping x and y constant.
> solve(a*x+b*y = 0, {a, b});

                             /      b y       \ 
                            { a = - ---, b = b }
                             \       x        / 
In your case, t0, t1, r2, ..., t7 are the variables to solve for, everything else is constant. Regards, --Jean-Marc
The second argument of solve is where one specify the variables, so whatever is not explicily mentioned here is deemed to be constant. For instance, below we solve for the variables a and b, keeping x and y constant.
> solve(a*x+b*y = 0, {a, b});

                             /      b y       \ 
                            { a = - ---, b = b }
                             \       x        / 
In your case, t0, t1, r2, ..., t7 are the variables to solve for, everything else is constant. Regards, --Jean-Marc
You could try the command line interface. How you start it depends on the system you are using. On Mac OS X, it is called maple, is located in the the following system folder /Library/Frameworks/Maple.framework/Versions/12/bin and looks more or less like this: 97_cmdlineinterface.jpg Anyway, I have uploaded a text file that holds a record of the session I ran earlier, in case it can be of some help for you. Download 97_systemofeightsymbolicequations.txt
View file details (Note that the link View file details generates an error "Fatal error: Allowed memory size of [....]" . The download link is OK, however".) HTH, --Jean-Marc
You could try the command line interface. How you start it depends on the system you are using. On Mac OS X, it is called maple, is located in the the following system folder /Library/Frameworks/Maple.framework/Versions/12/bin and looks more or less like this: 97_cmdlineinterface.jpg Anyway, I have uploaded a text file that holds a record of the session I ran earlier, in case it can be of some help for you. Download 97_systemofeightsymbolicequations.txt
View file details (Note that the link View file details generates an error "Fatal error: Allowed memory size of [....]" . The download link is OK, however".) HTH, --Jean-Marc
Well, the real question is, "Do you need a symbolic solution?" I am not sure what you can possibly do with such a large symbolic result. Visual inspection of dozens of pages of output? Attempting to simplify the solution means that you must have some knowledge about its structure (possible symtemtries, assumptions on parameters and/or variables, etc. ) So could you start by solving numerically your system? (Of course this implies that you provide numeric values for all parameters.) You should have a look at fsolve. See help("fsolve") for more info. Also, You could try the command line interface and/or add assumptions on the parameters or varaibles (complex, real, positive, etc.) HTH, --Jean-Marc
Well, the real question is, "Do you need a symbolic solution?" I am not sure what you can possibly do with such a large symbolic result. Visual inspection of dozens of pages of output? Attempting to simplify the solution means that you must have some knowledge about its structure (possible symtemtries, assumptions on parameters and/or variables, etc. ) So could you start by solving numerically your system? (Of course this implies that you provide numeric values for all parameters.) You should have a look at fsolve. See help("fsolve") for more info. Also, You could try the command line interface and/or add assumptions on the parameters or varaibles (complex, real, positive, etc.) HTH, --Jean-Marc
I have found where the option is located. However, increasing the limit makes the system unresponsive, to say the list! (I have unchecked the box labeled Limit expression length to.) 97_limitexpressionlengthto.jpg Regards, --Jean-Marc
I have found where the option is located. However, increasing the limit makes the system unresponsive, to say the list! (I have unchecked the box labeled Limit expression length to.) 97_limitexpressionlengthto.jpg Regards, --Jean-Marc
Well, when I said earlier that the solution was really huge, even Maple (in standard interface) thinks so :-) 97_lengthofoutputexceedslimit.jpg I shall try to find --- remember --- a way to increase this output limit (I am rather confident that this is possible, though I cannot remember what must be change right now). Regards, --Jean-Marc
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