Announcements

Announcements about MaplePrimes and Maplesoft

 

 The Joint Mathematics Meetings are taking place next week (January 1518) in Denver, CO. This meeting is a must-attend for anyone interested in learning about innovative mathematical research, advancing mathematical achievement, providing the communication and tools to progress in the field, encouraging mathematical research, and connecting with the mathematical community.

Maplesoft will at booth #1100  in the networking area (located just outside the exhibit hall doors). Stop by our booth or the networking area to chat with me and other members of the Maplesoft team, pick up some free Maplesoft swag or win some prizes. We’ve got some good ones!

There are also several interesting Maple-related talks and events happening this week. 

Attend our Workshop - Maple: Math Software for Teaching, Learning and Research

Thursday January 16th, 2020

Centennial Ballroom AHYATT Denver Colorado

Catered Reception: 6:00PM6:30PM
Training Workshop: 6:30PM8:00PM

Are you new to the Maple world and interested in finding out what Maple can do for you? Are you an old hand at Maple but curious about the many new features we’ve added in the past few years? Come join us for an interactive workshop that will guide you through Maple’s capabilities, with an emphasis on our latest additions.

The topics we’ll be covering include:

  • Our natural math notation for input and output
  • Tools for creating interactive documents that incorporate math, text and graphics
  • An overview of our vast library containing packages for advanced mathematics research scientific and engineering applications
  • A brief look at Maple’s powerful programming language|
  • Online and mobile tools that augment the Maple experience

Register herewww.com/ 

We are also 3 show floor talks, at the end of Aisle 600 inside the exhibits:

The Maple Companion App

 January 15

3:00 pm -3:55 pm

Using Maple to Enhance Teaching and Learning

 January 16

11:00 am-11:55 am

The Maple Companion App

January 17

11:00 am- 11:55 am

 

If you are attending the Joint Math Meetings and plan on presenting anything on Maple, please let me know and I'll add it to our list!


See you there!

Charlotte 

This update fixes the problems inadvertently introduced in Maple 2019.2, namely:

  • Maple failed to run the code in the maple.ini/.mapleinit initialization files when loading existing worksheets containing a restart() command
  • Installing some packages from the MapleCloud was unsuccessful

For anyone who installed the 2019.2 update, installing 2019.2.1 will fix these problems.

If you are at Maple 2019.1 or earlier, installing this update will bring you straight to Maple 2019.2.1.

This update is available through Tools>Check for Updates in Maple, and is also available from our website on the Maple 2019.2.1 download page.

If you are a MapleSim user, please note that these problems do not affect your use of MapleSim. If you use Maple on its own, and if you use Maple command initialization files and/or you need to install a package from the MapleCloud that does not work, please contact Maplesoft Technical Support for assistance.

We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience as we worked through this issue.

We have just released updates to Maple and MapleSim.

Maple 2019.2 includes corrections and improvements to a variety of areas in the product, including a new “Go to page ____” option in print preview (that am personally quite pleased about), sections are expanded by default when printing or exporting, a fix to a problem using non-executable math with text in document mode that sometimes made it impossible to advance to a new line using Enter, improvements to VectorCalculus, select, abs and other math functions, support for macOS Catalina, and more.  We recommend that all Maple 2019 users install these updates.

This update is available through Tools>Check for Updates in Maple, and is also available from our website on the Maple 2019.2 download page, where you can also find more details.

For MapleSim users, the MapleSim 2019.2 family of products includes enhancements in the areas of model development and toolchain connectivity, including substantial enhancements to the MapleSim CAD toolbox.   For more details and download instructions, visit the MapleSim 2019.2 download page.

I’m very pleased to announce that we have just released the Maple Companion mobile app for iOS and Android phones. As its name implies, this free app is a complement to Maple. You can use it to take pictures of math you find out in the wild (e.g. in your handwritten notes, on a blackboard, in a textbook), and bring that math into Maple so you can get to work.

The Maple Companion lets you:

  • Avoid the mistakes that can occur when transcribing mathematical expressions into Maple manually
  • Save time when entering multiple equations into Maple, such as when you are checking your homework or pulling information from a reference book
  • Push math you’ll need later into Maple now, even if you don’t have your computer handy

The Maple Companion is an idea we started playing with recently. We believe it has interesting potential as a tool to help students learn math, and we’d really like your feedback to help shape its future direction. This first release is a step towards that goal, so you can try it out and start thinking about what else you would like to see from an app like this. Should it bring in entire documents? Integrate with tutors and Math Apps? Help students figure out where they went wrong when solving a problem? Let us know what you think!

Visit Maple Companion to learn more, link to the app stores so you can download the app, and access the feedback form. And of course, you are also welcome to give us your ideas in the comment section of this post.

I just wanted to let everyone know that the Call for Papers and Extended Abstracts deadline for the Maple Conference has been extended to June 14.

The papers and extended abstracts presented at the 2019 Maple Conference will be published in the Communications in Computer and Information Science Series from Springer. We welcome topics that fall into the following broad categories:

  • Maple in Education
  • Algorithms and Software
  • Applications of Maple

You can learn more about the conference or submit your paper or abstract here: 

https://www.maplesoft.com/mapleconference/Papers-and-Presentations.aspx

Hope to hear from you soon!

We’re excited to announce that we have just released a new version of MapleSim. The MapleSim 2019 family of products helps you get the answers you need from your models, with improved performance, increased modeling scope, and more ways to connect to your existing toolchain. Improvements include:
 

  • Faster simulation speeds, both within MapleSim and when using exported MapleSim models in other tools

  • More simulation options are now available when running models imported from other systems

  • Additional options for FMI connectivity, including support for variable-step solvers with imported FMUs, and exporting models using variable step solvers using the MapleSim FMI Connector add-on

  • Improved interactive analysis apps for Monte Carlo analysis, Optimization, and Parameter Sweep

  • Expanded modeling scope in hydraulics, electrical, multibody, and more, with new built-in components and support for more external Modelica libraries

  • New add-on library: MapleSim Engine Dynamics Library from Modelon provides specialized tools for modeling, simulating, and analyzing the performance of combustion engines

  • New add-on connector: The B&R MapleSim Connector gives automation projects a powerful, model-based ability to test and visualize control strategies from within B&R Automation Studio
     

See What’s New in MapleSim 2019 for more information about these and other improvements!

Submit your paper or extended abstract to the Maple Conference!

The papers and extended abstracts presented at the 2019 Maple Conference will be published in the Communications in Computer and Information Science Series from Springer. 

The deadline to submit is May 27, 2019. 

This conference is an amazing opportunity to contribute to the development of technology in academics. I hope that you, or your colleagues and associates, will consider making a contribution.

We welcome topics that fall into the following broad categories:

  • Maple in Education
  • Algorithms and Software
  • Applications of Maple

You can learn more about the conference or submit your paper or abstract here: 

https://www.maplesoft.com/mapleconference/Papers-and-Presentations.aspx

It is my pleasure to announce the return of the Maple Conference! On October 15-17th, in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, we will gather a group of Maple enthusiasts, product experts, and customers, to explore and celebrate the different aspects of Maple.

Specifically, this conference will be dedicated to exploring Maple’s impact on education, new symbolic computation algorithms and techniques, and the wide range of Maple applications. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about the latest research, share experiences, and interact with Maple developers.

In preparation for the conference we are welcoming paper and extended abstract submissions. We are looking for presentations which fall into the broad categories of “Maple in Education”, “Algorithms and Software”, and “Applications of Maple” (a more extensive list of topics can be found here).

You can learn more about the event, plus find our call-for-papers and abstracts, here: https://www.maplesoft.com/mapleconference/

We have just released an update to Maple, Maple 2018.2. This release includes improvements in a variety of areas, including code edit regions, Workbooks, and Physics, as well as support for macOS 10.14.

This update is available through Tools>Check for Updates in Maple, and is also available from our website on the Maple 2018.2 download page, where you can also find more details.

For MapleSim users, the update includes optimizations for handling large models, improvements to model import and export, updates to the hydraulics and pneumatics libraries, and more. For more details and download instructions, visit the MapleSim 2018.2 download page.

As you may have already heard, in order accelerate the growth of our different product lines, Maplesoft decided to spin off our online education products into a separate company. Let me introduce you to DigitalEd.

DigitalEd will focus on online education technology, including online courseware, testing and assessment, and placement testing (i.e. Möbus, Maple T.A., and the Maple T.A. MAA Placement Test Suite). Maplesoft will continue to develop and support Maple, MapleSim, and their related products, for both academic and professional use.  The two companies will maintain close ties, and Maple will continue to supply the mathematical engine to the DigitalEd product line.

For more information about this change, see https://www.maplesoft.com/digitaled/

You can take a look at the new DigitalEd web site here:  www.digitaled.com.

We have just released a new version of MapleSim.  The MapleSim 2018 family of products offers new tools for developing digital twins, greater connectivity with other modeling tools, and expanded modeling scope. Improvements include:

  • New tools for creating motion profiles
  • FMI  import for FMI 2.0 Fixed-Step Co-Simulation
  • Optimized handling of large models
  • Inclusion of temperature effects in the MapleSim Hydraulics Library from Modelon and MapleSim Pneumatics Library from Modelon
  • Heat transfer through air and water with the MapleSim Heat Transfer Library from CYBERNET

See What’s New in MapleSim 2018 for more information about these and other improvements.

Today we are pleased to announce the release of Maple 2018.

For many people, today is just another day in March. It’s not like the release of a new version of a software product is a world-shaking event. But for us here at Maplesoft, these first few days after the latest version of Maple is released are always a bit more special. There’s always a nervous energy whenever we release Maple and everyone else gets to see what we’ve been pouring our efforts into for the past year.

I’m not going to start this post by calling the latest version of Maple “game-changing” or “cutting edge” or any other marketing friendly platitude. I’m well aware that the latest version of Maple isn’t going to change the world.

What I would say though is that with every new release of software comes an opportunity. Every new software release is an opportunity to re-evaluate how that software has evolved to better suit your needs and requirements. So… if you've been sitting on the sidelines and watching version after version go by, assuming that it won't affect you, that's wrong! There's a lot that you could be missing out on.

The way that these release announcements usually work is that we try to amaze and astound you with a long list of features. Don’t worry, I’ll get into that in a bit. But first I wanted to walk through a simple exercise of release arithmetic.

I’ll start with one of those basic truths that has always been hiding in plain sight. The build number # for Maple 2018 is 1298750. Here at Maplesoft, every time our developers make a change to Maple this build number goes up by 1. These changes are sometimes small and sometimes very big; they can be as small as fixing a documentation typo or they can constitute implementing a major feature spread across numerous files in our source tree.

I have come to look at these build numbers in a slightly different way. I look at build numbers as representing all of the small to large sized steps our developers take to get you from one version to the next (or put another way, how many steps behind you are if you are using the older versions). With that in mind, let’s do some quick math:

If you are using Maple 2017 (2017.0 was build # 1231047), there have been 1298750 – 1231047 = 67703 steps since that release (these numerous "steps" are what built the "long list" of features below). If you’re using Maple 2016 (#1113130) this number grows to 185620. And so it goes… Maple 2015 (#1022128) = 276622 steps, Maple 18 (#922027) = 376723, Maple 17 (#813473) = 485277, you get the idea. If you’re using a really old version of Maple – there’s a good chance that we have fixed up a bunch of stuff or added something that you might find interesting in the time since your last upgrade!

 

Every new release of Maple adds functionality that pushes Maple into new domains, rounds out existing packages, fills gaps, and addresses common user requests. Let's explore some additions:

 

Clickable Math - a.k.a. math that looks like math and can be interacted with using your mouse - has evolved. What was once a collection of operations found in the right-click or main menu items or in interactive smart-popups or in many additional dialogs, has been brought together and enhanced to form the new Context Panel.

We can summarize the Context Panel as follows: Enter an expression and relevant operations that you can apply to that expression appear in a panel on the right side of your screen. Easy, right? It's a great change that unlocks a large part of the Maple library for you.

The addition of the Context Panel is important. It represents a shift in the interaction model for Maple – you’ll see more and more interaction being driven through the context panel in future releases. Already, the changes for the Context Panel permeate through to various other parts of Maple too. You’ll see an example in the Units section below and here’s another for coding applications.

The Context Panel also gives you access to embedded component properties – this makes it much easier to modify parts of your application.

There’s much more we can say about the Context Panel but in the interest of keeping this post (somewhat) concise I’ll stop there. If you are interested and want to see more examples, watch this video.

 

Coding in Maple - For many of us, using the Maple coding language is fundamental; it's just what we do. Whether you write a lot of procedures, or modify the start-up code for your worksheet, or put a sequence of commands in a code edit region, or include a button or slider in your application, you’ll find yourself using Maple’s code editing tools.

For Code Edit Regions and the Maple Code Editor, there’s automatic command completion for packages, commands, and even file paths.

maplemint has been integrated into the Code Editor, providing code analysis while you write your code.

mint and maplemint have been unified and upgraded. If you’ve never heard of these before, these are tools for analysing your Maple code. They provide information on procedures, giving parameter naming conflicts, unreachable code, unused parameters or variables, and more. Mint is available for use with external text files and maplemint runs directly inside of Maple.

For more, I’ve got another video.

 

For many engineers and scientists, units are intrinsically linked with calculations. Here's something else in Maple 2018 that will improve your everyday experience – units are now supported in many core routines such as in numeric equation solving, integration, and optimization.

Here’s a quick example of using units in the int command with some thermophysical data:

We define an expression that gives the pressure of methane as a function of the specific volume V.

P := ThermophysicalData:-Property("pressure", "methane", "temperature" = 350*Unit('K'), "density" = 1/V):
-(int(P, V = 1.0*Unit('m'^3/'kg') .. .5*Unit('m'^3/'kg'), numeric));

You'll also find unit formatting in the Context Panel.

Near and dear to my heart, data analysts also have some occasion to rejoice. Maple 2018 finally adds an Interpolate command that supports irregular data! This is one of those items that users have been requesting for a long time and I'm very happy to say that it's finally here.

Furthering the data story, there are new sources for thermochemical data as well as updates to ensure that existing datasets for thermophysical data and scientific constants are up to date.

 

If you're interested in protecting your content in Maple, listen up:

You can now encrypt procedures; anyone can use your code, but they can't see the source!

You can also lock your Maple documents - effectively protecting them from accidental changes or other unintended modifications.

 

 

Of course, I won't leave mathematics out of this. As always, there’s a ton of new and updated stuff here.

There's a new computational geometry package. There are improvements across all fields of mathematics including group theory, graph theory, integration, differential equations and partial differential equations. And there's a ton of new work in Physics (many of you who have been following the Physics project will already know about these).

You can recreate some of the visualizations above as follows:

Here’s an example of the new VoronoiDiagram Command:

m := LinearAlgebra:-RandomMatrix(40, 2):
ComputationalGeometry:-VoronoiDiagram(m, showpoints, symbol = solidcircle, symbolsize = 7,colorregions=ColorTools:-GetPalette("Dalton"));

Here’s another change that I’ve seen mentioned several times on MaplePrimes – the ability to control the  border of arrows:

plots:-display(plottools:-arrow([0, 0], [2, 2], 0.5e-1, .2, .1, border = false, color = "DarkGrey", legend = "A+B"),
                       plottools:-arrow([0, 0], [1, 2], .15, .3, .15, border = false, color = "Crimson", legend = "A"),
                       plottools:-arrow([1, 2], [2, 2], .15, .3, .15, border = false, color = "CornflowerBlue", legend = "B"),
                   size = [600, 400]);

You can rotate Tickmarks in plots using the rotation option. Some plots, such as those in the TimeSeriesAnalysis package, use rotation by default.

ts := TimeSeriesAnalysis:-TimeSeries([7, 23, 21, 19, 13, 46, 42, 30, 31, 26, 19, 9, 16, 26, 17, 33, 31, 46, 42, 35, 45, 30, 11, 17, 23, 20, 15, 36, 31, 55, 49, 39, 36, 28, 12, 11, 21, 23, 27, 33, 36, 49, 42, 37, 33, 45, 12, 7, 23, 32, 25, 42, 27, 52, 50, 34, 41, 40, 16, 14], frequency = monthly, startdate = "2005-09");
TimeSeriesAnalysis:-SeasonalSubseriesPlot(ts, startingperiod = 9, seasonnames = ["January", "February", "March", "April", "May", "June", "July", "August", "September", "October", "November", "December"], space = .25, size = [800, 400]);

 

I’ll also mention some updates to the Maple language – items that the readers of this forum will likely find useful.

Dates and Times – Maple 2018 adds new data structures that represent dates and times. There are numerous functions that work with dates and times, including fundamental operations such as date arithmetic and more advanced functionality for working with Calendars.

today := Date();

Year( today ), DayOfMonth( today ), Month( today );

Date arithmetic:

One_year_ago := today - 365*Unit(d);

 

Until - An optional until clause has been added to Maple's loop control structure.

Here's an example, the following code finds the next prime number after 37 and then terminates the loop.

n := 37;

do n := n+1 until

    isprime(n):

n;

As always with these posts, we can't cover everything. This post is really just the beginning of the story. I would love to spend another couple of pages describing the inner-workings of every single improvement to Maple 2018 for you; however I'd rather you just try these features yourself, so go ahead, get out there and try out Maple 2018 today. You won't be disappointed that you did.

The Joint Mathematics Meetings are taking place this week (January 10 – 13) in San Diego, California, U.S.A. This will be the 101th annual winter meeting of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the 124nd annual meeting of the American Mathematical Society (AMS).

Maplesoft will be exhibiting at booth #505 as well as in the networking area. Please stop by our booth or the networking area to chat with me and other members of the Maplesoft team, as well as to pick up some free Maplesoft swag or win some prizes.

There are also several interesting Maple-related talks and events happening this week - I would definitely not miss the talk by our own Paulina Chin on grading sketch graphs.

 

Using Symbol-Crunching to find ALL Sucker's Bets (with given deck sizes). 

AMS Special Session on Applied and Computational Combinatorics, II 
Wednesday January 10, 2018, 2:15 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

Shalosh B. Ekhad, Rutgers University, New Brunswick 
Doron Zeilberger*, Rutgers University, New Brunswick 
 

Collaborative Research: Maplets for Calculus. 

MAA Poster Session: Projects Supported by the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education 
Thursday January 11, 2018, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Philip B. Yasskin*, Texas A&M University 
Douglas B. Meade, University of South Carolina 
Matthew Barry, Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service 
Andrew Crenwelge, Texas A&M University 
Joseph Martinson, Texas A&M University 
Matthew Weihing, Texas A&M University

 

Automated Grading of Sketched Graphs in Introductory Calculus Courses. 

AMS Special Session on Visualization in Mathematics: Perspectives of Mathematicians and Mathematics Educators, I 

Friday January 12, 2018, 9:00 a.m.

Dr. Paulina Chin*, Maplesoft 

 

Semantic Preserving Bijective Mappings of Mathematical Expressions between LaTeX and Computer Algebra Systems.

AMS Special Session on Mathematical Information in the Digital Age of Science, III 
Friday January 12, 2018, 9:00 a.m.-9:20 a.m.

Howard S. Cohl*, NIST 

 

Interactive Animations in MYMathApps Calculus. 

MAA General Contributed Paper Session on Mathematics and Technology 
Saturday January 13, 2018, 11:30 a.m.-11:40 a.m.

Philip B. Yasskin*, Texas A&M University 
Andrew Crenwelge, Texas A&M University 
Joseph Martinsen, Texas A&M University 
Matthew Weihing, Texas A&M University 
Matthew Barry, Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station 

 

Applying Maple Technology in Calculus Teaching To Create Artwork. 

MAA General Contributed Paper Session on Teaching and Learning Calculus, II 
Saturday January 13, 2018, 2:15 p.m.

Lina Wu*, Borough of Manhattan Community College-The City University of New York

 

If you are attending the Joint Math meetings this week and plan on presenting anything on Maple, please feel free to let me know and I'll update this list accordingly.


See you in San Diego!

Daniel

Maple Product Manager

I am pleased to announce that a new release of Maple T.A., our online testing and assessment system, is now available. Maple T.A. 2017 includes significant enhancements to learning management system integration, as well as security, performance, and other improvements. These same improvements are also available in a new version of the  Maple T.A. MAA Placement Test Suite.  For more information, see What’s New in Maple T.A. 

 

We’ve just released a major new version of MapleSim. The MapleSim 2017 family of products provides new and improved model development and analysis tools, expands modeling scope, introduces new deployment options, and strengthens toolchain connectivity.  Here are some highlights:

  • The new Initialization Diagnostics App further simplifies the initialization task by helping you determine how your initial values are computed and what you need to do to adjust them.
     
  • The new Modal Analysis App helps you explore and understand the natural vibration modes of your mechanism, so you can determine how to reduce the vibration in the final product. 
     
  • Over 100 new components include expansions to the Electrical and Magnetic libraries.
     
  • A new Modelica® code editor makes it easier to create Modelica-based custom components.
     
  • The MapleSim Heat Transfer Library from CYBERNET, a new add-on component library, provides a comprehensive view into heat transfer effects in your model, enabling you to refine your  design to improve performance and avoid overheating.
     
  • The new MapleSim Explorer product provides a cost-effective deployment solution that allows you to make MapleSim models available to more people in your organization.

 

There’s more, of course.  See What’s New in MapleSim for lots more details.

eithne

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Last Page 1 of 19