taro

490 Reputation

12 Badges

8 years, 186 days
Maple is to me difficult. The first version I bought was Maple9, and it was more than 15 years ago. But, I couldn't use it, feeling it too difficult. But, three years ago, I thought Maple might be helpful to my study, and since then, I have continued to learn Maple. As I got able to read the Maple help, I think that I could get to use maple better now than before. But, I feel that I am a beginner yet.

MaplePrimes Activity


These are replies submitted by taro

@Alejandro Jakubi 

 

Thank you. Alejandro

Owing to you, I could understand the difference between applyrule and algsubs.

And, thank you for your teaching that Int is better. I think that surely, it is.

 

Best wishes.

 

taro

 

@Carl Love

@acer 

 

Thank you for your teaching.

The use of eq||(1..4) was new to me.

And, I could know it was good to use avriables which numbers are the same as the number of the equations.

And, the way to use eliminate was helpful to me.

 

@Carl Love

By the way, how is "~" used, which you use in your line?

Best wishes

 

taro

 

 

 

@ramakrishnan 

@Kitonum

@ThU

 

Thank you. I could understand ' is a command to delay the execution of the command.

As x cannot be judged wether being larger than 10 or not, surely it should be delayed to be plotted with command plot.

 

taro

@Kitonum 

 

Thank you for telling me how to use applyrule.

Take care.

 

taro

@acer 

 

Thank you for your kindness of telling me how to do about applyrule.

 

Taro

@Ali Nouri 

As you can see shorcuts for maple on Mac, which you can find with google,

alt+enter is the operation to have your Mac do inline evaluation.

 

On the other hand, I think you found it difficult to find the keys of alt and enter.

In fact, the Key of OPTION has another letters of alt.

And, in Mac, shift + return is used as enter, which is the convention for Mac generally.

 

So, the answer to your question is 

option+shift+return

 

take care

 

taro

 

restart;
z := x + y;
type(z, specop(name, `+`));

true

@Alejandro Jakubi 

 

Hello Alejandro,

 

Thank you for teling me the usage of convert with the type. As I hadn't used to it, I had some difficulty to 

understand the end part of the last reply from you. But, it is OK now.

In the help of maple, there was its explanation:

A user can make custom conversions known to the convert function by defining a Maple procedure in the following way. If the procedure `convert/f` is defined, then the function call convert(a, f, x, y, ...) will invoke `convert/f`(a, x, y, ...);

But, on the other hand, I thought that its code could be written in a different way as

convert2:=proc(x) `<`(op(x)); end proc:
convert2([a,b]);

 

Best wishes.

taro

 

 

 

 

 

 

@Preben Alsholm 

@Carl Love 

@Alejandro Jakubi

 

Thank Preben and Carl for telling me about map, which is the complete solution to the first way I wrote.

Thank Alejandro for telling me that the procedure has a specification not allowing the consideration of the sign.

 

As for the second way I wrote, what I had considered was the following.

restart;

c:=a<b;

op(0,c),op(1,c),op(2,c);

From the three variable of the result of the second line, can I construct c again?

I think this is the same in essense that

Can we constract a*b  from ('`*`')(a,b); which Alejandro wrote?

But, I want to leave this question aside.

 

Instead, I will consider a different way though essentially the same in respect of considering each atoms, 

restart;

e:=op(c);

f:=convert([e],lessthan);

But, this returns an error saying that 

Error, (in convert/lessthan) argument must be of type relation.

[e] is surely a list, and the name of 'list' has the same level of zero as that of '<' in c; op(0,c) is `<`.

 But, as `<` is a relation, the attribute of `list` cannot be converted to another attribute of `<`, which is what 

the Error above means.

 

On the other hand, the reverse can be possible.

g:=a<b;

convert(g,`*`);

Or,

g:=a<b;

h:=op(g);

convert([h],`*`);

 

In the end, modification from a relation to arithmetric operator or list is OK.

But, from the latter to the former is not OK.

 

Thank you all for your answering my question.

 

Best wishes.

 

taro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

@acer 

Thank you for your instruction.

I could solve the inequality by following your teaching.

 

Best wishes.

Taro

Thank you for telling how to use various sites of maplesoft.

I had felt a little awkward in using them, thinking I had just begun to use  Maple.

I am going to check them from now.

 

taro

 

 

@Joe Riel 

Thank you for your instruction.

I could obtain what I wanted to.

 

Best wishes.

taro

@Joe Riel 

Thank you for your novel idea, of picking a unmodified part aside, not directry modifying

the part I wanted to modify.

 

Best wishes.

taro

 

 

 

@Carl Love 

 

Thank you for your teaching. I could understand it well.

Best wishes.

taro

@Carl Love 

 

Thank you Carl. I owe you a lot.

By the way, I wrote next two codes.

 

algsubs(op(3,denom(op(ex)[1]))=factor(op(3,denom(op(ex)[1]))),ex);

subs(op(3,denom(op(ex)[1]))=factor(op(3,denom(op(ex)[1]))),ex);

 

But, with these, in the first, "factor" does not work well, and the result is the same as the original equation.

And, in the second, it works well.

Why does this occur?

 

If you can guess some reason, can't I have additional reply from you?

 

Taro

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