Product Tips & Techniques

Tips and Tricks on how to get the most about Maple and MapleSim

 

Physics

 

 

Maple provides a state-of-the-art environment for algebraic and tensorial computations in Physics, with emphasis on ensuring that the computational experience is as natural as possible.

 

The theme of the Physics project for Maple 2017 has been the consolidation of the functionality introduced in previous releases, together with significant enhancements and new functionality in General Relativity, in connection with classification of solutions to Einstein's equations and tensor representations to work in an embedded 3D curved space - a new ThreePlusOne  package. This package is relevant in numerical relativity and a Hamiltonian formulation of gravity. The developments also include first steps in connection with computational representations for all the objects entering the Standard Model in particle physics.

Classification of solutions to Einstein's equations and the Tetrads package

 

In Maple 2016, the digitizing of the database of solutions to Einstein's equations  was finished, added to the standard Maple library, with all the metrics from "Stephani, H.; Kramer, D.; MacCallum, M.; Hoenselaers, C.; and Herlt, E., Exact Solutions to Einstein's Field Equations". These metrics can be loaded to work with them, or change them, or searched using g_  (the Physics command representing the spacetime metric that also sets the metric to your choice in one go) or using the command DifferentialGeometry:-Library:-MetricSearch .


In Maple 2017, the Physics:-Tetrads  package has been vastly improved and extended, now including new commands like PetrovType  and SegreType  to classify these metrics, and the TransformTetrad  now has an option canonicalform to automatically derive a transformation and put the tetrad in canonical form (reorientation of the axis of the local system of references), a relevant step in resolving the equivalence between two metrics.

Examples

 

Petrov and Segre types, tetrads in canonical form

   

Equivalence for Schwarzschild metric (spherical and Kruskal coordinates)

 

Formulation of the problem (remove mixed coordinates)

   

Solving the Equivalence

   

The ThreePlusOne (3 + 1) new Maple 2017 Physics package

 

ThreePlusOne , is a package to cast Einstein's equations in a 3+1 form, that is, representing spacetime as a stack of nonintersecting 3-hypersurfaces Σ. This 3+1 description is key in the Hamiltonian formulation of gravity as well as in the study of gravitational waves, black holes, neutron stars, and in general to study the evolution of physical system in general relativity by running numerical simulations as traditional initial value (Cauchy) problems. ThreePlusOne includes computational representations for the spatial metric gamma[i, j] that is induced by g[mu, nu] on the 3-dimensional hypersurfaces, and the related covariant derivative, Christoffel symbols and Ricci and Riemann tensors, the Lapse, Shift, Unit normal and Time vectors and Extrinsic curvature related to the ADM equations.

 

The following is a list of the available commands:

 

ADMEquations

Christoffel3

D3_

ExtrinsicCurvature

gamma3_

Lapse

Ricci3

Riemann3

Shift

TimeVector

UnitNormalVector

 

 

The other four related new Physics  commands:

 

• 

Decompose , to decompose 4D tensorial expressions (free and/or contracted indices) into the space and time parts.

• 

gamma_ , representing the three-dimensional metric tensor, with which the element of spatial distance is defined as  `#mrow(msup(mi("dl"),mrow(mo("⁢"),mn("2"))),mo("="),msub(mi("γ",fontstyle = "normal"),mrow(mi("i"),mo(","),mi("j"))),mo("⁢"),msup(mi("dx"),mi("i")),mo("⁢"),msup(mi("dx"),mi("j")))`.

• 

Redefine , to redefine the coordinates and the spacetime metric according to changes in the signature from any of the four possible signatures(− + + +), (+ − − −), (+ + + −) and ((− + + +) to any of the other ones.

• 

EnergyMomentum , is a computational representation for the energy-momentum tensor entering Einstein's equations as well as their 3+1 form, the ADMEquations .

 

Examples

 

restart; with(Physics); Setup(coordinatesystems = cartesian)

`Default differentiation variables for d_, D_ and dAlembertian are: `*{X = (x, y, z, t)}

 

`Systems of spacetime Coordinates are: `*{X = (x, y, z, t)}

 

[coordinatesystems = {X}]

(2.1.1)

with(ThreePlusOne)

`Setting lowercaselatin_is letters to represent space indices `

 

0, "%1 is not a command in the %2 package", ThreePlusOne, Physics

 

`Changing the signature of spacetime from `(`- - - +`)*` to `(`+ + + -`)*` in order to match the signature customarily used in the ADM formalism`

 

[ADMEquations, Christoffel3, D3_, ExtrinsicCurvature, Lapse, Ricci3, Riemann3, Shift, TimeVector, UnitNormalVector, gamma3_]

(2.1.2)

Note the different color for gamma[mu, nu], now a 4D tensor representing the metric of a generic 3-dimensional hypersurface induced by the 4D spacetime metric g[mu, nu]. All the ThreePlusOne tensors are displayed in black to distinguish them of the corresponding 4D or 3D tensors. The particular hypersurface gamma[mu, nu] operates is parameterized by the Lapse  alpha and the Shift  beta[mu].

The induced metric gamma[mu, nu]is defined in terms of the UnitNormalVector  n[mu] and the 4D metric g[mu, nu] as

gamma3_[definition]

Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-gamma3_[mu, nu] = Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-UnitNormalVector[mu]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-UnitNormalVector[nu]+Physics:-g_[mu, nu]

(2.1.3)

where n[mu] is defined in terms of the Lapse  alpha and the derivative of a scalar function t that can be interpreted as a global time function

UnitNormalVector[definition]

Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-UnitNormalVector[mu] = -Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Lapse*Physics:-D_[mu](t)

(2.1.4)

The TimeVector  is defined in terms of the Lapse  alpha and the Shift  beta[mu] and this vector  n[mu] as

TimeVector[definition]

Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-TimeVector[mu] = Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Lapse*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-UnitNormalVector[mu]+Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[mu]

(2.1.5)

The ExtrinsicCurvature  is defined in terms of the LieDerivative  of  gamma[mu, nu]

ExtrinsicCurvature[definition]

Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-ExtrinsicCurvature[mu, nu] = -(1/2)*Physics:-LieDerivative[Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-UnitNormalVector](Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-gamma3_[mu, nu])

(2.1.6)

The metric gamma[mu, nu]is also a projection tensor in that it projects 4D tensors into the 3D hypersurface Σ. The definition for any 4D tensor that is also a 3D tensor in Σ, can thus be written directly by contracting their indices with gamma[mu, nu]. In the case of Christoffel3 , Ricci3  and Riemann3,  these tensors can be defined by replacing the 4D metric g[mu, nu] by gamma[mu, nu] and the 4D Christoffel symbols GAMMA[mu, nu, alpha] by the ThreePlusOne GAMMA[mu, nu, alpha] in the definitions of the corresponding 4D tensors. So, for instance

Christoffel3[definition]

Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[mu, nu, alpha] = (1/2)*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-gamma3_[mu, `~beta`]*(Physics:-d_[alpha](Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-gamma3_[beta, nu], [X])+Physics:-d_[nu](Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-gamma3_[beta, alpha], [X])-Physics:-d_[beta](Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-gamma3_[nu, alpha], [X]))

(2.1.7)

Ricci3[definition]

Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Ricci3[mu, nu] = Physics:-d_[alpha](Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~alpha`, mu, nu], [X])-Physics:-d_[nu](Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~alpha`, mu, alpha], [X])+Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~beta`, mu, nu]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~alpha`, beta, alpha]-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~beta`, mu, alpha]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~alpha`, nu, beta]

(2.1.8)

Riemann3[definition]

Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Riemann3[mu, nu, alpha, beta] = Physics:-g_[mu, lambda]*(Physics:-d_[alpha](Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~lambda`, nu, beta], [X])-Physics:-d_[beta](Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~lambda`, nu, alpha], [X])+Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~lambda`, upsilon, alpha]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~upsilon`, nu, beta]-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~lambda`, upsilon, beta]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[`~upsilon`, nu, alpha])

(2.1.9)

When working with the ADM formalism, the line element of an arbitrary spacetime metric can be expressed in terms of the differentials of the coordinates dx^mu, the Lapse , the Shift  and the spatial components of the 3D metric gamma3_ . From this line element one can derive the relation between the Lapse , the spatial part of the Shift , the spatial part of the gamma3_  metric and the g[0, j] components of the 4D spacetime metric.

For this purpose, define a tensor representing the differentials of the coordinates and an alias  dt = `#msup(mi("dx"),mn("0"))`

Define(dx[mu])

`Defined objects with tensor properties`

 

{Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-D3_[mu], Physics:-Dgamma[mu], Physics:-Psigma[mu], Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Ricci3[mu, nu], Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[mu], Physics:-d_[mu], dx[mu], Physics:-g_[mu, nu], Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-gamma3_[mu, nu], Physics:-gamma_[i, j], Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Christoffel3[mu, nu, alpha], Physics:-KroneckerDelta[mu, nu], Physics:-LeviCivita[alpha, beta, mu, nu], Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Riemann3[mu, nu, alpha, beta], Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-TimeVector[mu], Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-ExtrinsicCurvature[mu, nu], Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-UnitNormalVector[mu], Physics:-SpaceTimeVector[mu](X)}

(2.1.10)

"alias(dt = dx[~0]):"

The expression for the line element in terms of the Lapse  and Shift   is (see [2], eq.(2.123))

ds^2 = (-Lapse^2+Shift[i]^2)*dt^2+2*Shift[i]*dt*dx[`~i`]+gamma_[i, j]*dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`]

ds^2 = (-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Lapse^2+Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[`~i`])*dt^2+2*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i]*dt*dx[`~i`]+Physics:-gamma_[i, j]*dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`]

(2.1.11)

Compare this expression with the 3+1 decomposition of the line element in an arbitrary system. To avoid the automatic evaluation of the metric components, work with the inert form of the metric %g_

ds^2 = %g_[mu, nu]*dx[`~mu`]*dx[`~nu`]

ds^2 = %g_[mu, nu]*dx[`~mu`]*dx[`~nu`]

(2.1.12)

Decompose(ds^2 = %g_[mu, nu]*dx[`~mu`]*dx[`~nu`])

ds^2 = %g_[0, 0]*dt^2+%g_[0, j]*dt*dx[`~j`]+%g_[i, 0]*dt*dx[`~i`]+%g_[i, j]*dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`]

(2.1.13)

The second and third terms on the right-hand side are equal

op(2, rhs(ds^2 = dt^2*%g_[0, 0]+dt*%g_[0, j]*dx[`~j`]+dt*%g_[i, 0]*dx[`~i`]+%g_[i, j]*dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`])) = op(3, rhs(ds^2 = dt^2*%g_[0, 0]+dt*%g_[0, j]*dx[`~j`]+dt*%g_[i, 0]*dx[`~i`]+%g_[i, j]*dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`]))

%g_[0, j]*dt*dx[`~j`] = %g_[i, 0]*dt*dx[`~i`]

(2.1.14)

subs(%g_[0, j]*dt*dx[`~j`] = %g_[i, 0]*dt*dx[`~i`], ds^2 = dt^2*%g_[0, 0]+dt*%g_[0, j]*dx[`~j`]+dt*%g_[i, 0]*dx[`~i`]+%g_[i, j]*dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`])

ds^2 = %g_[0, 0]*dt^2+2*%g_[i, 0]*dt*dx[`~i`]+%g_[i, j]*dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`]

(2.1.15)

Taking the difference between this expression and the one in terms of the Lapse  and Shift  we get

simplify((ds^2 = dt^2*%g_[0, 0]+2*dt*%g_[i, 0]*dx[`~i`]+%g_[i, j]*dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`])-(ds^2 = (-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Lapse^2+Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[`~i`])*dt^2+2*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i]*dt*dx[`~i`]+Physics:-gamma_[i, j]*dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`]))

0 = (Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Lapse^2-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[`~i`]+%g_[0, 0])*dt^2+2*dx[`~i`]*(%g_[i, 0]-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i])*dt-dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`]*(Physics:-gamma_[i, j]-%g_[i, j])

(2.1.16)

Taking coefficients, we get equations for the Shift , the Lapse  and the spatial components of the metric gamma3_

eq[1] := coeff(coeff(rhs(0 = (Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Lapse^2-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[`~i`]+%g_[0, 0])*dt^2+2*dx[`~i`]*(%g_[i, 0]-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i])*dt-dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`]*(Physics:-gamma_[i, j]-%g_[i, j])), dt), dx[`~i`]) = 0

2*%g_[i, 0]-2*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i] = 0

(2.1.17)

eq[2] := coeff(rhs(0 = (Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Lapse^2-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[`~i`]+%g_[0, 0])*dt^2+2*dx[`~i`]*(%g_[i, 0]-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i])*dt-dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`]*(Physics:-gamma_[i, j]-%g_[i, j])), dt^2)

Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Lapse^2-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[`~i`]+%g_[0, 0]

(2.1.18)

eq[3] := coeff(coeff(rhs(0 = (Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Lapse^2-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[`~i`]+%g_[0, 0])*dt^2+2*dx[`~i`]*(%g_[i, 0]-Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i])*dt-dx[`~i`]*dx[`~j`]*(Physics:-gamma_[i, j]-%g_[i, j])), dx[`~i`]), dx[`~j`]) = 0

-Physics:-gamma_[i, j]+%g_[i, j] = 0

(2.1.19)

Using these equations, these quantities can all be expressed in terms of the time and space components of the 4D metric g[0, 0] and g[i, j]

isolate(eq[1], Shift[i])

Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i] = %g_[i, 0]

(2.1.20)

isolate(eq[2], Lapse^2)

Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Lapse^2 = Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[i]*Physics:-ThreePlusOne:-Shift[`~i`]-%g_[0, 0]

(2.1.21)

isolate(eq[3], gamma_[i, j])

Physics:-gamma_[i, j] = %g_[i, j]

(2.1.22)

References

 
  

[1] Landau, L.D., and Lifshitz, E.M. The Classical Theory of Fields, Course of Theoretical Physics Volume 2, fourth revised English edition. Elsevier, 1975.

  

[2] Alcubierre, M., Introduction to 3+1 Numerical Relativity, International Series of Monographs on Physics 140, Oxford University Press, 2008.

  

[3] Baumgarte, T.W., Shapiro, S.L., Numerical Relativity, Solving Einstein's Equations on a Computer, Cambridge University Press, 2010.

  

[4] Gourgoulhon, E., 3+1 Formalism and Bases of Numerical Relativity, Lecture notes, 2007, https://arxiv.org/pdf/gr-qc/0703035v1.pdf.

  

[5] Arnowitt, R., Dese, S., Misner, C.W., The Dynamics of General Relativity, Chapter 7 in Gravitation: an introduction to current research (Wiley, 1962), https://arxiv.org/pdf/gr-qc/0405109v1.pdf

  

 

Examples: Decompose, gamma_

 

restartwith(Physics)NULL

Setup(mathematicalnotation = true)

[mathematicalnotation = true]

(2.2.1)

Define  now an arbitrary tensor A

Define(A)

`Defined objects with tensor properties`

 

{A, Physics:-Dgamma[mu], Physics:-Psigma[mu], Physics:-d_[mu], Physics:-g_[mu, nu], Physics:-KroneckerDelta[mu, nu], Physics:-LeviCivita[alpha, beta, mu, nu]}

(2.2.2)

So A^mu is a 4D tensor with only one free index, where the position of the time-like component is the position of the different sign in the signature, that you can query about via

Setup(signature)

[signature = `- - - +`]

(2.2.3)

To perform a decomposition into space and time, set - for instance - the lowercase latin letters from i to s to represent spaceindices and

Setup(spaceindices = lowercase_is)

[spaceindices = lowercaselatin_is]

(2.2.4)

Accordingly, the 3+1 decomposition of A^mu is

Decompose(A[`~mu`])

Array(%id = 18446744078724512334)

(2.2.5)

The 3+1 decomposition of the inert representation %g_[mu,nu] of the 4D spacetime metric; use the inert representation when you do not want the actual components of the metric appearing in the output

Decompose(%g_[mu, nu])

Matrix(%id = 18446744078724507998)

(2.2.6)

Note the position of the component %g_[0, 0], related to the trailing position of the time-like component in the signature "(- - - +)".

Compare the decomposition of the 4D inert with the decomposition of the 4D active spacetime metric

g[]

g[mu, nu] = (Matrix(4, 4, {(1, 1) = -1, (1, 2) = 0, (1, 3) = 0, (1, 4) = 0, (2, 1) = 0, (2, 2) = -1, (2, 3) = 0, (2, 4) = 0, (3, 1) = 0, (3, 2) = 0, (3, 3) = -1, (3, 4) = 0, (4, 1) = 0, (4, 2) = 0, (4, 3) = 0, (4, 4) = 1}))

(2.2.7)

Decompose(g_[mu, nu])

Matrix(%id = 18446744078724494270)

(2.2.8)

Note that in general the 3D space part of g[mu, nu] is not equal to the 3D metric gamma[i, j] whose definition includes another term (see [1] Landau & Lifshitz, eq.(84.7)).

gamma_[definition]

Physics:-gamma_[i, j] = -Physics:-g_[i, j]+Physics:-g_[0, i]*Physics:-g_[0, j]/Physics:-g_[0, 0]

(2.2.9)

The 3D space part of -g[`~mu`, `~nu`] is actually equal to the 3D metric "gamma[]^(i,j)"

"gamma_[~,definition];"

Physics:-gamma_[`~i`, `~j`] = -Physics:-g_[`~i`, `~j`]

(2.2.10)

To derive the formula  for the covariant components of the 3D metric, Decompose into 3+1 the identity

%g_[`~alpha`, `~mu`]*%g_[mu, beta] = KroneckerDelta[`~alpha`, beta]

%g_[`~alpha`, `~mu`]*%g_[mu, beta] = Physics:-KroneckerDelta[beta, `~alpha`]

(2.2.11)

To the side, for illustration purposes, these are the 3 + 1 decompositions, first excluding the repeated indices, then excluding the free indices

Eq := Decompose(%g_[`~alpha`, `~mu`]*%g_[mu, beta] = Physics[KroneckerDelta][beta, `~alpha`], repeatedindices = false)

Matrix(%id = 18446744078132963318)

(2.2.12)

Eq := Decompose(%g_[`~alpha`, `~mu`]*%g_[mu, beta] = Physics[KroneckerDelta][beta, `~alpha`], freeindices = false)

%g_[0, beta]*%g_[`~alpha`, `~0`]+%g_[i, beta]*%g_[`~alpha`, `~i`] = Physics:-KroneckerDelta[beta, `~alpha`]

(2.2.13)

Compare with a full decomposition

Eq := Decompose(%g_[`~alpha`, `~mu`]*%g_[mu, beta] = Physics[KroneckerDelta][beta, `~alpha`])

Matrix(%id = 18446744078724489454)

(2.2.14)

Eq is a symmetric matrix of equations involving non-contracted occurrences of `#msup(mi("g"),mrow(mn("0"),mo(","),mn("0")))`, `#msup(mi("g"),mrow(mi("j"),mo(","),mo("0")))` and `#msup(mi("g"),mrow(mi("j"),mo(","),mi("i")))`. Isolate, in Eq[1, 2], `#msup(mi("g"),mrow(mi("j"),mo(","),mo("0")))`, that you input as %g_[~j, ~0], and substitute into Eq[1, 1]

"isolate(Eq[1, 2], `%g_`[~j, ~0]);"

%g_[`~j`, `~0`] = -%g_[i, 0]*%g_[`~j`, `~i`]/%g_[0, 0]

(2.2.15)

subs(%g_[`~j`, `~0`] = -%g_[i, 0]*%g_[`~j`, `~i`]/%g_[0, 0], Eq[1, 1])

-%g_[0, k]*%g_[i, 0]*%g_[`~j`, `~i`]/%g_[0, 0]+%g_[i, k]*%g_[`~j`, `~i`] = Physics:-KroneckerDelta[k, `~j`]

(2.2.16)

Collect `#msup(mi("g"),mrow(mi("j"),mo(","),mi("i")))`, that you input as %g_[~j, ~i]

collect(-%g_[0, k]*%g_[i, 0]*%g_[`~j`, `~i`]/%g_[0, 0]+%g_[i, k]*%g_[`~j`, `~i`] = Physics[KroneckerDelta][k, `~j`], %g_[`~j`, `~i`])

(-%g_[0, k]*%g_[i, 0]/%g_[0, 0]+%g_[i, k])*%g_[`~j`, `~i`] = Physics:-KroneckerDelta[k, `~j`]

(2.2.17)

Since the right-hand side is the identity matrix and, from , `#msup(mi("g"),mrow(mi("i"),mo(","),mi("j")))` = -`#msup(mi("γ",fontstyle = "normal"),mrow(mi("i"),mo(","),mi("j")))`, the expression between parenthesis, multiplied by -1, is the reciprocal of the contravariant 3D metric `#msup(mi("γ",fontstyle = "normal"),mrow(mi("i"),mo(","),mi("j")))`, that is the covariant 3D metric gamma[i, j], in accordance to its definition for the signature `- - - +`

gamma_[definition]

Physics:-gamma_[i, j] = -Physics:-g_[i, j]+Physics:-g_[0, i]*Physics:-g_[0, j]/Physics:-g_[0, 0]

(2.2.18)

NULL

References

 
  

[1] Landau, L.D., and Lifshitz, E.M. The Classical Theory of Fields, Course of Theoretical Physics Volume 2, fourth revised English edition. Elsevier, 1975.

Example: Redefine

   

Tensors in Special and General Relativity

 

A number of relevant changes happened in the tensor routines of the Physics package, towards making the routines pack more functionality both for special and general relativity, as well as working more efficiently and naturally, based on Maple's Physics users' feedback collected during 2016.

New functionality

 
• 

Implement conversions to most of the tensors of general relativity (relevant in connection with functional differentiation)

• 

New setting in the Physics Setup  allows for specifying the cosmologicalconstant and a default tensorsimplifier


 

Download PhysicsMaple2017.mw

Edgardo S. Cheb-Terrab
Physics, Differential Equations and Mathematical Functions, Maplesoft

While preparing for a recent webinar, I ran across something that didn't behave the same way in Maple 2017 as it did in previous releases. In particular, it was the failure of the over-dot notation for t-derivatives to display with the over-dot. Turns out that this is due to a change in behavior of typesetting that was detailed in the What's New page for Maple 2017, a page I had looked at many times in the last few months, but apparently didn't comprehend fully. The details are below.

Prior to Maple 2017, under the aegis of extended typesetting, the following two lines of code would alert Maple that the over-dot notation for t-derivatives should be used in the output display.

However, this changed in Maple 2017. Extended typesetting is now the default, but these two lines of code are no longer sufficient to induce Maple to display the over-dot in output. Indeed, we would now have

as output. The change is documented in the following paragraph

lifted from the help page 

Thus, it now takes the additional command

to induce Maple to display the over-dot notation in output.

I must confess that, even though I pored over the "What's New" pages for Maple 2017, I completely missed the import of this change to typesetting. I stumbled over the issue while preparing for an upcoming webinar, and frantically sent out help calls to the developers back in the building. Fortunately, I was quickly set straight on the matter, but was disappointed in my own reading of all the implications of the typesetting changes in Maple 2017. So perhaps this note will alert other users to the changes, and to the help page wherein one finds those essential bits of information needed to complete the tasks we set for ourselves.

And one more thing - I was cautioned that the "= true" was essential. Without it, the command would act as a query, echoing the present state of the setting, and not making the desired change to the setting.
 

Let us consider the help to RectangleWindow SignalProcessing-RectangleWindow.pdf SignalProcessing-RectangleWindow.mw.
Let us execute the example, taking N:=4 (in order to display the outputs).

with(SignalProcessing):
N := 4;
a := GenerateUniform(N, -1, 1);
         Matrix(1, 4, [[.396167882718146, -.826878267806025, -0.908376742154361e-2, .324899681378156]])         
RectangleWindow(a);
         Vector[row](4, [.396167882718146, -.826878267806025, -0.908376742154361e-2, .324899681378156])      
c := Array(1 .. N, 'datatype' = 'float'[8], 'order' = 'C_order'):
RectangleWindow(Array(1 .. N, 'fill' = 1, 'datatype' = 'float'[8], 'order' = 'C_order'), 'container' = c);
              Vector[row](4, [1., 1., 1., 1.])
u := `~`[log](FFT(c)):
plots:-display(Array([plots:-listplot(Re(u)), plots:-listplot(Im(u))]));



We see an uncommented code which (intentionally or unintentionally) produces two empty plots.
The questions arise:

  • What is the aim of the RectangleWindow command which does nothing 
    but the conversion of a Matrix(1,N,...) /Array(1..N,...) to a Vector[row](N,...)? 
  • Could such help be called friendly to Maple users?

There are many questions to Maplesoft and there are no answers from them: strategic silence.
RectangleWindow.mw

 

In the creation of this animation the technique from here  was used.

 

                    

 

The code of this animation:

with(plots): with(plottools):
SmallHeart:=plot([1/20*sin(t)^3, 1/20*(13*cos(t)/16-5*cos(2*t)/16-2*cos(3*t)/16-cos(4*t)/16), t = 0 .. 2*Pi], color = "Red", thickness=3, filled):
F:=t->[sin(t)^3, 13*cos(t)/16-5*cos(2*t)/16-2*cos(3*t)/16-cos(4*t)/16]:
Gf:=display(translate(SmallHeart, 0,0.37)):
Gl:=display(translate(SmallHeart, 0,-1)):
G:=t->display(translate(SmallHeart, F(t)[])):
A:=display(seq(display(op([Gf,seq(G(-Pi/20*t), t=3..k),seq(G(Pi/20*t), t=3..k)]))$4,k=2..17),display(op([Gf,seq(G(-Pi/20*t), t=3..17),seq(G(Pi/20*t), t=3..17),Gl]))$30, insequence=true, size=[600,600]):
B:=animate(textplot,[[-0.6,0.25, "Happy"[1..round(n)]],color="Orange", font=[times,bolditalic,40], align=right],n=0..5,frames=18, paraminfo=false):
C:=animate(textplot,[[-0.2,0, "Valentine's"[1..round(n)]],color=green, font=[times,bolditalic,40], align=right],n=1..11,frames=35, paraminfo=false):
E:=animate(textplot,[[-0.3,-0.25, "Day!"[1..round(n)]],color="Blue", font=[times,bolditalic,40], align=right],n=1..4,frames=41, paraminfo=false):
T:=display([B, display(op([1,-1,1],B),C), display(op([1,-1,1],B),op([1,-1,1],C),E)], insequence=true):
K:=display(A, T, axes=none):
K;


The last frame of this animation:

display(op([1,-1],K), size=[600,600], axes=none);  # The last frame

                          

 

ValentinelDay.mw
 

Edit. The code was edited - the number of frames has been increased.

Let us consider the linear integer programming problem:

A := Matrix([[1, 7, 1, 3], [1, 6, 4, 6], [17, 1, 5, 1], [1, 6, 10, 4]]):
 n := 4; z := add(add(A[i, j]*x[i, j], j = 1 .. n), i = 1 .. n):
restr := {seq(add(x[i, j], i = 1 .. n) = 1, j = 1 .. n), seq(add(x[i, j], j = 1 .. n) = 1, i = 1 .. n)}:
 sol := Optimization[LPSolve](z, restr, assume = binary);

Error, (in Optimization:-LPSolve) no feasible integer point found; 
use feasibilitytolerance option to adjust tolerance

sol1 := Optimization[LPSolve](z, restr, assume = binary, feasibilitytolerance = 100, integertolerance = 1);

Error, (in Optimization:-LPSolve) no feasible integer point found;
 use feasibilitytolerance option to adjust tolerance

That was OK in Maple 16, outputting

.

The bug in one of the principal Maple commands lasts since Maple 2015, where the above code causes "Kernel connection has been lost". The SCRs about it were submitted three times (see http://www.mapleprimes.com/questions/204750-Bug-In-LPSolve-In-Maple-20151).

We have just released a small update to MapleSim.  MapleSim 2016.2a is an update to MapleSim 2016.2 that includes improvements in several areas, including corrections to problems related to custom components and importing Modelica libraries. As usual, we recommend that every MapleSim customer install all available updates.  The update is availble through Help>Check for Updates and as a download from our website.  See MapleSim 2016.2a for details.

eithne

Let us consider 

restart; 
MultiSeries:-limit(sin(n)/n, n = infinity, complex);
0

The answer is wrong: in view of the Casorati-Weierstrass theorem the limit does not exist. Let us try another limit command of Maple

limit(sin(n)/n, n = infinity, complex);


(lim) (sin(n))/(n)

which fails. Therefore, Maple user does not obtain the correct answer. 

We have just released an update to Maple.  It includes updates to the Maple Workbook, the video component, the Physics package, and many other small improvements throughout the product. It is available through Tools>Check for Updates in Maple, and is also available from our website on the Maple 2016.2 download page.

eithne

We have just released a major update to MapleSim and the MapleSim family of products. This update includes significant enhancements in the areas of model development and toolchain connectivity, including:

  • Live simulations let you see results as the simulation is running, so you can track progress and react to problems immediately.
  • A new 3-D overlay option lets you easily compare simulation visualizations by overlaying one visualization on top of another
  • Tools for revision control enable a structured approach to managing and tracking changes to your model, making it easier to manage projects when multiple engineers are working on the same model and reducing development risk.
  • MapleSim now supports direct import of models created in other FMI-compatible software, providing even greater cross-tool compatibility and opportunities for co-simulation.
  • The MapleSim Connector, for connectivity with Simulink®, and the MapleSim Connector for FMI, for exporting MapleSim models to other FMI-compatible tools, have been expanded to allow you to explore simulation results involving exported MapleSim models from within MapleSim, even though the simulation was done in the target tool.

 

This update is being distributed through the automatic Check for Updates system, and is also available from our website. See the MapleSim 2016.2  downloads page for details on obtaining this update.

eithne

 

Let us consider 

with(Statistics);
U := RandomVariable(DiscreteUniform(-10, 10)):
V := RandomVariable(DiscreteUniform(-10, 10)):
Probability(U^2-V^2 <= 1/9, numeric);
  0.

, whereas a positive number greater than 1/21 is expected. 

 

Let us consider the example from Maple help to ?ProbabilityFunction (also see ?Geometric)

with(Statistics):
ProbabilityFunction(Geometric(1/3), 5);
                              32 /729
                             

Let us continue the investigation

ProbabilityFunction(Geometric(1/3), 5.1);
0.4215152817e-1
ProbabilityFunction(Geometric(1/3), 5.12);
0.4181109090e-1
ProbabilityFunction(Geometric(1/3), 51/10)
(32/2187)*2^(1/10)*3^(9/10)

whereas the result 0 is expected in all the three cases up to Wiki. I am aware of the line

"t-algebraic; point (assumed to be an integer)"

in the help. However, 

ProbabilityFunction(Geometric(1/3), -.5);
                               0

The same issue with the DiscreteUniform distribution. This bug lasts from  at least Maple 16. The question arises: may we trust Maple?

Let us consider

restart; Digits := 20; evalf(Int(abs(cos(1/t)), t = 0 .. 0.1e-1), 3);
   -0.639e-2

Pay your attention to the minus sign. Simply no words. Mma produces 0.006377.

evalf@Int.mw

Ian Thompson has written a new book, Understanding Maple.

I've been browsing through the book and am quite pleased with what I've read so far. As a small format paperback of just over 200 pages it packs in a considerable amount of useful information aimed at the new Maple user. It says, "At the time of writing the current version is Maple 2016."

The general scope and approach of the book is explained in its introduction, which can currently be previewed from the book's page on amazon.com. (Click on the image of the book's cover, to "Look inside", and then select "First Pages" in the "Book sections" tab in the left-panel.)

While not intended as a substitute for the Maple manuals (which, together, are naturally larger and more comprehensive) the book describes some of the big landscape of Maple, which I expect to help the new user. But it also explains how Maple is working at a lower level. Here are two phrases that stuck out: "This book takes a command driven, or programmatic, approach to Maple, with the focus on the language rather than the interface", followed closely by, "...the simple building blocks that make up the Maple language can be assembled to solve complex problems in an efficient way."

 

 

 

Let us consider 

Student[Precalculus]:-LimitTutor(sqrt(x), x = 2);

One expects a nice illustration of the result sqrt(2). But instead of that one reads "f(x) approaches 1.41 as x approaches 2". This is simply ignorant and forms a wrong understanding of limits. It should also be noticed that all the entries (left, 2-sided, and right) produce the same animation. The same issue with other limits I tried, e.g.

Student[Precalculus]:-LimitTutor(sqrt(x), x = 1);

. I think this command should be completely rewritten or excluded from Maple. 

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