MaplePrimes Posts

MaplePrimes Posts are for sharing your experiences, techniques and opinions about Maple, MapleSim and related products, as well as general interests in math and computing.

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  • Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación
    Santiago de Chile

    Derivative operator on vectors of real variable (R3): applied to curvilinear motion with Maple and MapleSim

    In the present work it will be demonstrated how the derivative operator acts in functions of real variable in the movement of a particle that performs a curvilinear trajectory; using the scientific software of the Maplesoft company known by the names Maple and MapleSim, because nowadays most university teachers (higher education) do not visualize the movement of the particle in real time as well as the results of the calculations of speed and acceleration simultaneously. The objectives achieved are to use the vector operator with the help of these programs. As a theoretical tool we will use the three-dimensional vector spaces of real variable with Newton's notation. The methodology we have used was native syntax and embedded components using block diagrams. For the case of particle motion we use the graphical programming proposed by MapleSim. Viable results were achieved for motivational effects and time reduction in complex calculations without neglecting innovation in physical sciences, for teachers in higher education and university students. This work is self-sustaining via Maple Cloud.

    Lenin Araujo Castillo

    Ambassador of Maple

    Guys, this is still the most painful thing i Maple for me, and I hope this gets a high priority for future development.

    It is still not possible to compare variables, when one of them could become zero.

    with(Units[Standard])

    [`*`, `+`, `-`, `/`, `<`, `<=`, `<>`, `=`, Im, Re, `^`, abs, add, arccos, arccosh, arccot, arccoth, arccsc, arccsch, arcsec, arcsech, arcsin, arcsinh, arctan, arctanh, argument, ceil, collect, combine, conjugate, cos, cosh, cot, coth, csc, csch, csgn, diff, eval, evalc, evalr, exp, expand, factor, floor, frac, int, ln, log, log10, log2, max, min, mul, normal, polar, root, round, sec, sech, seq, shake, signum, simplify, sin, sinh, sqrt, surd, tan, tanh, trunc, type, verify]

    (1)

    a := 15*Unit('kN')

    15*Units:-Unit(kN)

    (2)

    b := 0*Unit('kN')

    0

    (3)

    NULL``

    if a < b then "True" else "False" end if

    Error, cannot determine if this expression is true or false: 15*Units:-Unit(kN) < 0

     

    NULL

    Download CompareUnits.mw

    This is my second try---my previous post about the Maple Conference  https://www.maplesoft.com/mapleconference/2021/ seems to have vanished into thin electrons.

    Anyway!  The conference opens tomorrow!  There are many really interesting prerecorded talks, three live plenaries, two excellent panels, and registration is free!  See the above link.

    I look forward to "seeing" you tomorrow.

    Rob Corless, co-Chair of the Program Committee

    on behalf of the organizers

    As many of you are aware, the Maple Application Center is a very important resource for Maple users. It is a place for authors to share their Maple work, and for users to have access to a rich collection of over 2,500 curated Maple documents covering a wide array of topics and disciplines.

    I am very pleased to announce that we have been hard at work on a new version of the Application Center, and it’s at a state where we’re ready to open it up to the public for testing. You can access the new site here: https://www.maplesoft.com/applications_beta . We are looking for feedback, so please give it a try, and let us know what you think!

    Here are a few of my favorite features of the new site:

    Updated Look & Feel
    The interface of the current version of the Application Center has not changed in many years, and it was time for a new paint job. I think you’ll find that the new site is cleaner, modern, and more enjoyable to use.

    Easier to Find the Documents you Want
    The updated Application Center provides multiple new ways to find content that is relevant for you. Browse user-made collections of documents or use tags (the same tags used in MaplePrimes) to find documents for the topics you are interested in. Alternatively, you can use the search bar to quickly find documents, tags or authors.

    Personalize your Experience
    If you are logged-in when using the Application Center, you will be able to customize what you see by pinning your favorite collections, authors or tags to your home page.

    Community Moderation & Reputation
    As with MaplePrimes, the strength of the Application Center comes from the amazing community of individuals who contribute to it. In addition to submitting your own content to the Application Center, users can now edit tags and create collections of content that others can use. Similar to MaplePrimes, community moderation is restricted to members who have a sufficient reputation score. Speaking of reputation, quality contributions to MaplePrimes will now be reflected in your reputation score. When someone likes one of your submissions, your reputation will increase by 5.

     

    There are many other great new features as well, and we have a roadmap of future updates planned that will make it even better.

    I invite you to take a look at the new site and play with it. Browse some content, search, look through tags, and create some collections. Most importantly, I’m really hopeful that you will then use the comments section below to let us know what you think. Did you discover any bugs or issues? What do you like? What do you dislike? What other features would you like to see?

    We are hoping to run the Beta for a period of a few weeks, and I’m looking forward to hearing and reading your thoughts. Hope you enjoy it!

    https://www.maplesoft.com/applications_beta

    Bryon

    Dear all,

    The November issue of Maple Transactions is now up (we will be adding a few more items to that issue over the course of the month).  See https://mapletransactions.org/index.php/maple/index for the articles.

    More importantly, Maple Primes seems to have a great many interesting posts, some of which could well be worked up into a paper (or a video).  Maple Transactions accepts worksheets (documents, workbooks) for publication, as well, although we want a high standard of readability for that.  I invite you to contribute.

    The next issue of Maple Transactions will be the Special Issue that is the Proceedings of the Maple Conference 2021 (see my previous post :)

    -r

    Do you have a Chromebook?  Are you a student or a teacher looking for the mighty power of Maple, but find yourself limited by your web-only computer? Well, have no fear, because Maple Learn is here!

    As a web-based application, Maple Learn is fully supported by Chromebooks. You can create graphs, perform and check calculations, and share documents all within the comfort of your own browser. No need to download any kind of software—just go to learn.maplesoft.com to get started!

    Students, if you’re looking for some use for your school-provided Chromebook and wondering how it can help you learn instead of just weighing down your backpack, Maple Learn can help. It’s the perfect, all-inclusive tool to help you learn, visualize, and check your math. And, if you’re looking to brush up on all that math you forgot over the summer, you can check out the Maple Learn Example Gallery, home to hundreds of examples and explanations of a wide variety of math concepts. And it’s all accessible on your Chromebook!

    Hi to all,

    Dr. Lopez's "Advanced Engineering Mathematics with Maple" is just excellent... I strongly advise...

    That book is my most favorite and Dr. Lopez is my favorite teacher :)

    Here's a podcast that covers a few topics that get discussed on MaplePrimes.
     

    We all like finding the right tool for the job. In the Sep 2021 episode of the Engineering Matters Podcast “#127 – Tools for Thinking” you can discover how far engineers have come in their quest for better tools.

    It features contributions from several members of the Maplesoft team as they discuss how the user experience shapes the adoption of engineering software tools.

    The hosts have fun describing some early calculation hacks - from early Sumerian farmers using their fingers as tally counters, to the paper calculus notebooks of the 1850s used by historical engineering figures like Isambard Kingdom Brunel. What starts as a necessity gets improved over time to save them mental effort – all driven by the way users interact with the tool.

    This episode gives a behind-the-scenes look at some of the decisions that shaped the engineering product that is now Maple Flow from its roots in Maple. Maplesoft CEO Laurent Bernardin describes the spark of innovation in the late 1970s, when two professors at the University of Waterloo developed Maple. “The two professors got together, realising that there was a need in math education for a tool to help with calculations and setting out to create that tool. And Maple was born quickly, was adopted across universities around the globe.”

    As engineers typically work in ways far removed from the regular academic setting, Product Manager Samir Khan weighs in on the shift that comes from a different user base: “Different tools have different design intents,” says Khan. “Some tools are designed for programmers such as code development environments, like Visual Studio. Some environments are aimed at mathematicians, people who need precise control over the mathematical structure of their equations, and some environments are designed for engineers who simply want to throw down a few equations on a virtual whiteboard and manipulate them and get results.”

    The conversation also touches on the design of the GUI itself. Margaret Hinchcliffe, Maple’s Senior GUI Developer expresses the importance of smoothing the user experience - drilling down and taking “the typical tasks that people want to do the most, and make those the most immediate. So really focusing on how many keystrokes do they need to do this task?”.

    Ironically the idea of the paper notebook still has features that are desirable. Khan muses on the idea that Maplesoft has “taken the first step with having a virtual whiteboard, but Maple Flow still relies on keyboard and mouse input”. He offers suggestions for what may be next in the industry: “It’d be interesting to see if we can take advantage of modern advances in deep learning and AI to imitate what humans are doing and interpreting handwritten mathematics.”

    You can listen to the entire podcast (~30 min) here: https://engineeringmatters.reby.media/2021/09/30/the-evolution-of-tools-for-thinking/

    From a tweet by Tamás Görbe : plotting Chebyshev polynomials in polar coordinates leads to some interesting pictures.  Screenshot here, link to the worksheet (and some perhaps interesting puzzles) at the end.