MaplePrimes Announcement

We’ve been busy! We have just released the 2021.2 updates for Maple, Maple Flow, and MapleSim. Here’s a quick overview. These updates are freely available to all customers who have the 2021 version of these products.

Maple

The Maple update includes a variety of corrections and improvements to the math engine and interface. It is available through Tools>Check for Updates in Maple, and is also available from the Maple 2021 download page, where you can also find more details.

In particular, this update includes fixes to the bug in the combine command when working with double summations, and the problems when performing context menu operations on values with units while in Document mode, both of which were reported on MaplePrimes. As always, we appreciate the feedback!

Maple Flow

The Maple Flow 2021.2 update offers a richer range of formatting features for creating professional-looking engineering documents, which have been requested by customers. Highlights include sections, controlling the display of commands, annotating images, and disabling automatic evaluation while making a series of changes.  This update is available from the Maple Flow 2021.2 download page, which also contains more details.

MapleSim

Lots of good stuff here that makes it easier to build and analyze models, including productivity features that speed up the creation of models that use hydraulics, support for the latest CAD file formats in the MapleSim CAD toolbox, the ability to model drift conditions with the MapleSim Tire Library, tools for simulating 3-D winding effects with the MapleSim Ropes and Pulleys Library, and a new MapleSim Web Handling Library add-on (which, I am sad to say, has nothing to do with Spiderman). See What’s New in MapleSim for details, and the MapleSim 2021.2 download page for instruction on how to obtain your update.

Featured Post

Some years ago I taught a calculus course for especially talented students. I made up the following problem as an interesting challenge.

Take a circular disk made of paper. Cut out a sector of some angle α from the disk. Roll each of the resulting two pieces into cones. Let V(α) be the sum of the volumes of the two cones. Find the α that maximizes V(α).

Here is an animated statement of the problem, produced in Maple.

 

Featured Post

One of the things I love most about my job is working and collaborating with math teachers across the globe. Every discussion leads to additional insights into the challenges facing teachers today, and new ideas on how to make Maple and Maple Learn better. And sometimes, I even learn some math I thought I already knew!

A few months ago, I introduced Maple Learn to a friend of mine who teaches high school math in Kingston, Ontario. I showed her how she could use Maple Learn to teach many concepts during our call, including Completing the Square. I walked her through Maple Learn’s free-form canvas and explained how her students could work through a problem line-by-line just as they would in their notebooks. I highlighted the live plot window and showed how her students could graphically verify that their solution was equivalent to the initial expression. And, I demonstrated the power of Maple Learn’s intelligent context panel and how her students could check their answers algebraically. I thought I had done a good job, until she said: “Karishma, that’s not how we teach Completing the Square anymore!”. Huh! I was floored. What I had shown was the way I had learned the concept so many years ago. I was surprised to learn that there was a new way.

My friend then introduced me to Algebra Tiles and how she used it to teach Completing the Square. Once we went through a few examples, I realized that I had never fully appreciated what I was doing when I completed the square. I had memorized a series of steps without really understanding what I was trying to do. The progression of our discussion naturally led to the inevitable question: “Karishma, does Maple Learn include Algebra tiles? Because that would be a game-changer for my students. Currently, we use physical tiles, but with remote learning, we need something digital.” At that time, my answer was ‘not yet’; however, with the introduction of image support last week, I’m happy to announce that Maple Learn can support algebra tiles and other interactive supports.

Here is the Maple Learn document I created on Completing the Square using Algebra Tiles.

Feel free to change the expressions listed in the document and share it with your students. To see algebra tiles in action inside Maple Learn, take a look at the short video that I created.  If you have any suggestions for improving this application, please feel free to let me know.

 


 



Signing in to Maple

Maple 2020 asked by davegoodo 15 Today

Printing math expressions

Maple asked by ArashMhasa... 15 December 01

make the curve smooth

Maple 2021 asked by moon 5 Today